2018 Natsu Basho.

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Swami, May 10, 2018.

  1. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Great match between Tochinoshin vs Ichinojo.

    What's going on with Goeido? His sumo is really lacking this time around.

    Yutakayama fought like a beast against Hakuho. Good sumo for a guy with an 0-8 record.

    Aminishiki looks tired and maybe should consider retiring at the end of this basho.
     
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  2. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    The other one who definitely needs to retire is Terunofuji, he withdrew from the tournament a few days ago and that will mean a former ozeki being demoted to makushita. Even though he is only 26/27, he has lost all his power.

    Swami
     
  3. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Goeido withdraws from summer meet, no ozeki remaining
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 21 May 2018
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    Goeido became the second ozeki to pull out of the ongoing Summer Grand Sumo Tournament on Monday, leaving no wrestler in the second-highest rank left to compete in the 15-day meet at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan.

    According to Goeido's stablemaster Sakaigawa, the 32-year-old wrestler from Osaka has been suffering from chronic pain in his left ankle and was diagnosed Sunday with osteochondral bone defect that will require four weeks of recovery.

    Goeido, who leaves with a 3-6 record, joins fellow ozeki Takayasu and yokozuna Kisenosato on the casualty list. Takayasu is out with a left upper arm injury and will fight in a demotion-threatened "kadoban" status at the Nagoya meet in July.

    Takayasu's Tagonoura stablemate Kisenosato, who is recovering from a left chest muscle injury, extended his streak of missed events to a yokozuna-equaling seven meets by choosing not to compete.

    Goeido lost his last three bouts and will forfeit his scheduled bout against sekiwake Ichinojo on Monday and be given a loss by default.

    For the seventh time in his career Goeido will fight as a "kadoban" ozeki in July. It is also the seventh time he will miss all or part of a meet.

    "I think it's his left ankle. I noticed his feet had been unable to get a firm grip on the dohyo. I told him to quit on the third day but he insisted he stay (in the tournament)," Sakaigawa said.

    Swami
     
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  4. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Natsu Day 9: Tochinoshin remains sole leader of Summer tourney
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 21 May 2018
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    Sekiwake Tochinoshin retained his lead and a perfect record with an easy victory over No. 3 maegashira Daieisho on Monday, the ninth day of the 15-day Summer Grand Sumo Tournament.

    Tochinoshin, who could be promoted to sumo's second-highest rank of ozeki with 10 wins here, once again showcased his brute strength in a one-sided win against Daieisho (2-7) at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan.

    The Georgian grabbed onto his opponent's belt with both hands, lifted the 162-kilogram maegashira clear off his feet and pushed him out of the ring. Tochinoshin, who won his first makuuchi division championship in January, improved his career record against Daieisho to 3-1.

    Yokozuna Kakuryu and Hakuho, along with No. 11 maegashira Chiyonokuni, had convincing wins and remain one back of the sekiwake with eight victories each.

    In the day's final bout, Kakuryu, who is aiming for his first back-to-back championship, defeated Shodai (6-3) in seconds after steamrolling the No. 4 maegashira straight from the ring.

    Hakuho, who missed the March tourney due to injury, took down No. 5 Kotoshogiku (6-3) and improved to 8-1 since suffering a shock defeat three days ago to No. 2 Abi.

    The Mongolian yokozuna, eyeing his 41st championship title, bulldozed Kotoshogiku toward the edge. After his opponent gained a few feet back, the grand champion executed a textbook overarm throw to stay in contention.

    Hakuho will wrestle komusubi Endo (3-4-2) in Tuesday's final bout. The fan-favorite Endo will make his return to the raised ring after pulling out due to a right-arm injury on Saturday.

    Chiyonokuni (8-1) secured a winning record at the meet after beating No. 14 Takekaze (4-5). Chiyonokuni took control by slapping his opponent's face with his left hand while pushing Takekaze's chest with his right, forcing Takekaze to hop out of the ring.

    The 27-year-old Chiyonokuni posted his first winning record since September 2017, when he fought as the No. 7 maegashira. "I told myself not to concentrate too much on winning or losing, and just do my best," the Kokonoe stable wrestler said. "I'm really glad."

    Sekiwake Ichinojo (5-4) snapped his four-match losing streak with a default win over ozeki Goeido (3-6), who pulled out from the meet earlier in the day with left-ankle trouble. Goeido joins fellow ozeki Takayasu and yokozuna Kisenosato on the casualty list here. It is the first time two ozeki have withdrawn from a tournament since the sport went to 15-day meets in 1949.

    Swami
     
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  5. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Wow, Goeido is out. Hopefully Tochinoshin can keep his sumo going strong to achieve Ozeki at the end of this tourney. That rank needs some healthy rikishi.

    I see Endo is on the list to face Hakaho on Tuesday. At this point I want to see Tochinoshin or Kakuryu win this basho. I have been impressed with Ikioi. Good to see Kotoshogiku doing better then the two previous bashos thus far.
     
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  6. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    I think Tochinoshin needs at least 11 wins to make it to ozeki, given his last two scores.

    Swami
     
  7. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Natsu Day 10: Both yokozuna win, Tochinoshin stays perfect
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 22 May 2018
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    Yokozuna Hakuho overcame a spirited effort Tuesday from komusubi Endo to remain one win off the pace at the Summer Grand Sumo Tournament.

    Fellow grand champion Kakuryu likewise improved to 9-1 with a somewhat controversial win, while tournament leader Tochinoshin maintained a perfect record on Day 10 at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan.

    In the final bout of the day, all-time championship record-holder Hakuho squared off against the fan-favorite Endo (3-5-2), who was making his return to the raised ring after pulling out of the tournament Saturday with an injured right arm.

    With Hakuho seeking a belt hold in the opening exchange, Endo initially retreated to the edge of the ring before fighting his way through a flurry of slaps from the grand champion to gain forward momentum.

    As the younger fighter attempted to push the Mongolian out, Hakuho was able to turn him around and shove him out from behind.

    In the day's shortest bout, Kakuryu slapped down No. 5 maegashira Kotoshogiku (6-4) in half a second, earning an easy win but also the disapproval of some sumo purists in the crowd for his use of a frowned-upon evasive technique.

    Sekiwake Tochinoshin used brute force to overcome No. 4 Chiyotairyu (4-6) and retain sole lead in the tournament with a perfect 10-0 record.

    Chiyotairyu opened with a shoulder charge but failed to budge Tochinoshin, allowing the powerful Georgian to gain a belt hold before lifting the 190-kilogram maegashira over the straw.

    In a highly entertaining bout, komusubi Mitakeumi (7-3) gutted out a tough win against No. 5 Ikioi (7-3) after being driven to the edge of the straw.

    After nearly pushing out his opponent, former sekiwake Mitakeumi was forced backward, planting his feet on the inside of the straw before throwing Ikioi to the ground.

    The biggest man in the tournament, 224-kg sekiwake Ichinojo, improved to 6-4 when he easily pushed out No. 4 Shodai (6-4) in 3.7 seconds.

    Swami
     
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  8. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    I wasn't a big fan of Kakuryu's tactic in his bout with Kotoshogiku. I like him but that is not yokozuna style sumo. I had the same opinion when Goeido did the same thing last basho to Toshinoshin.

    What caught my attention the most on Day 10 was Hokutofuji probable concussion during his match with Ryuden. The gyoji or someone in authority should have called the match. Hokutofuji was not well and collapsed after he left the dohyo. This is a man's life and well being here. I hope Hokutofuji is well and gets the attention he needs. I know sumo is very rough but when someone is not well it's not really a competition.
     
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  9. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Yes, Kakuryu's henka was very unbecoming of a yokozuna. I'm surprised the ringside judges didn't pick up on Hokutofuji's concussion.

    Swami
     
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  10. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Natsu Day 11: Tochinoshin remains ahead of yokozuna duo with 11-0 mark
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 23 May 2018
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    Tochinoshin remained at the top of the heap with an unbeaten record on Wednesday, the 11th day of the Summer Grand Sumo Tournament. Tochinoshin remained one win ahead of Hakuho and fellow yokozuna Kakuryu, who survived a scare against komusubi Mitakeumi (7-4) at Tokyo’s Ryogoku Kokugikan.

    Tochinoshin, who is gunning for a second makuuchi division championship and an ozeki promotion, overturned an initial challenge from No. 5 maegashira Kotoshogiku (6-5) to continue the best start of his career.

    Kotoshogiku, who entered the match with a 24-7 career record against Tochinoshin, got the better of the initial charge by seizing a left-hand overarm hold.

    The Georgian was momentarily pushed back by his opponent before Kotoshogiku withstood Tochinoshin’s attempt to toss him with his right arm. But the sekiwake saw an opening and maneuvered into his favored left-handed belt grip, then slammed the maegashira down with a powerful overarm throw.

    On Thursday, Tochinoshin will face Hakuho, whom he has yet to beat in 25 matchups.

    Hakuho, who is chasing a record-extending 41st title after withdrawing from this year’s first two basho, easily dispatched No. 4 Shodai (6-5) in Wednesday’s penultimate bout.

    Kakuryu made good progress on his opening slap-and-shove assault against Mitakeumi. But the komusubi found a second wind with his back to the straw, countered and nearly drove the yokozuna from the ring.

    But Kakuryu’s well-executed retreat forced the youngster to lunge forward off balance. As Kakuryu danced away to one side, he slapped the stumbling Mitakeumi down at the straw bales.

    Sekiwake Ichinojo (7-4) earned a quick victory over Chiyotairyu (4-7), when the hefty Mongolian stopped the No. 4 maegashira’s charge and turned him out of the ring by his belt.

    Fan-favorite Endo (3-6-2) was pushed to a losing record by top-ranked maegashira Tamawashi (4-7), meaning a likely forfeiture of his recently-gained komusubi status.

    Tamawashi stood his ground after the initial clash, then easily forced his opponent out to post an eighth straight win over Endo, who lost to Hakuho upon returning to the ring Tuesday after withdrawing for two bouts due to a right-arm injury.

    Among the lower-ranked wrestlers, No. 11 Chiyonokuni (8-3), who was the only wrestler two wins off the pace after Day 10, fell further behind after losing to No. 16 Myogiryu (8-3).

    At the bottom of the table, No. 15 Kyokutaisei (8-3) defeated Bulgarian juryo wrestler Gagamaru (2-9) to secure a winning record in his makuuchi-division debut.

    Swami
     
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  11. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    It was good to see Hokutofuji out after is injury on Tuesday. He needs time to recover.

    Looks as if Tochinoshin's promotion to ozeki is ever more likely. I'm very eager to see his match between Hakuko on Thursday. IMO, the two best rikishi in this basho.

    LOL, Shohozan is a bull. I hope he gets his kachi-koshi.
     
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  12. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    I hope Tochinoshin can beat both yokozuna, that would lend an extra bit of shine to his promotion.

    Swami
     
  13. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Natsu Day 12: Tochinoshin stays perfect, gets 1st win over Hakuho
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 24 May 2018
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    Sekiwake Tochinoshin maintained his perfect record and sole share of the lead Thursday with a breakthrough victory over yokozuna Hakuho on Day 12 of the Summer Grand Sumo Tournament. The Georgian-born sekiwake came into the final bout of the day at Ryogoku Kokugikan without a single win in 25 previous attempts against the all-time championship record-holder.

    After a false start from Hakuho, the pair locked up in the center of the ring, each gripping the other's belt with nearly identical holds.

    With the two powerfully built wrestlers holding each other in a stalemate, it was Tochinoshin who was able to dislodge his opponent's foothold before pushing him to the straw. As Hakuho dug in his heels, Tochinoshin mustered the strength for a final drive to force the grand champion over the straw bales.

    The loss dropped Hakuho to 10-2 and into third place at the 15-day tournament. Fellow Mongolian grand champion Kakuryu (11-1) moved into sole share of second place following his win over Ikioi (8-4) in the penultimate bout of the day.

    The yokozuna needed nimble footwork to overcome the aggressive No. 5 maegashira, who secured a winning record the previous day.

    The lower-ranked wrestler took the offensive from the outset as he sought to grab hold of the grand champion. Kakuryu backpedaled while slapping at Ikioi before pouncing on an opening for a push-out victory.

    Komusubi Mitakeumi (7-4) hit a speedbump in his bid to regain sekiwake status in the form of No. 4 Chiyotairyu (5-7). The lower-ranked wrestler opened the bout with a shoulder blast that knocked his opponent backward and left him vulnerable to a quick push out.

    Popular komusubi Endo (3-7-2) succumbed to No. 1 Kaisei (4-8) in his third-straight loss since returning to the tournament after a two-match injury layoff.

    Endo started the match on the front foot, driving Kaisei backward until the 204-kilogram Brazilian dug in at the edge of the straw. As Endo tried to force him out, Kaisei leveraged his 52-kg weight advantage to twist his opponent to the clay.

    No. 5 Kotoshogiku (7-5) forced out Ichinojo (7-5) to move within one victory of a winning record for the tournament. The former ozeki resisted an attempted throw by the 224-kg Mongolian before driving him backward over the straw.

    Swami
     
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  14. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Amazing stuff from Tochinoshin, he is on fire at the moment.

    Swami
     
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  15. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    That was an amazing match! :clap: One couldn't ask for more. Respects to both Tochinoshin and Hakuho.

    Kakuryu's sumo can be sloppy but he seems to find a way to win. Ikioi has had a good basho.
     
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  16. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Kakuryu will be Tochinoshin's last major obstacle for a second yusho. If Tochinoshin gets zensho he'd the first sekiwake since Futabayama in the 1930s to win 15-0.

    Swami
     
  17. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Natsu Day 13: Kakuryu grabs share of lead as Tochinoshin loses
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 25 May 2018
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    Mongolian yokozuna Kakuryu grabbed a share of the lead Friday at the Summer Grand Sumo Tournament after sekiwake Tochinoshin suffered his first loss. Kakuryu (12-1) dispatched sekiwake Ichinojo (7-6) in Day 13's final bout at Ryogoku Kokugikan, using good technique to overcome a 65-kilogram weight disadvantage against the biggest wrestler in the makuuchi division.

    The grand champion quickly secured an inside grip with both hands, resisting an attempted lift before driving his towering compatriot to the straw bales. As Ichinojo tried to push back, Kakuryu found the leverage to dislodge the 225-kg, 193-centimeter giant.

    Tochinoshin (12-1) is all but guaranteed promotion to sumo's second-highest rank of ozeki following his Day 12 win over grand champion Hakuho. But the Georgian once more fell victim to No. 4 maegashira Shodai, who also beat him at the Spring Grand Tournament in Osaka.

    Tochinoshin slammed into Shodai at the outset, but the maegashira held his ground, driving forward against the powerful sekiwake. Unable to secure a belt grip, Tochinoshin surged forward but appeared to lose his footing, allowing the backpedaling Shodai to pull him down to the clay.

    With the victory, Shodai (8-5) secured a winning record with two days remaining in the 15-day tournament. The result also left the door open for all-time championship record-holder Hakuho, who improved to 11-2 with a win over No. 5 Ikioi (8-5).

    Hakuho drove Ikioi to the edge of the ring before the maegashira fought his way back to the center. As the pair locked up in the middle, Hakuho patiently set his grip before once again maneuvering his opponent to the edge and upending him with an overarm throw.

    Komusubi Mitakeumi (8-5) secured a winning record with a victory over fifth-ranked Kotoshogiku (7-6). After locking up his opponent in the opening exchange, the former sekiwake looked set to execute a quick force-out, but was pushed back to the center of the ring before eventually driving the one-time ozeki out.

    Komosubi Endo (3-7-2) succumbed to a push-out against tenacious No. 2 Shohozan (6-7) to remain winless since returning to the tournament after missing two bouts with a right-arm injury.

    Swami
     
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  18. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Saturday's Tochinoshin vs Kakuryu match is a going to be interesting. I'm curious as to what tools Kakuryu will use as he can't match Tochinoshin's power. Respects to Shodai, a rikishi never to underestimate.

    I'm also looking for who gets their kachi-koshi in the remain days. Kotoshogiku, Shohozan, Yoshikaze, Ichinojo, Takarafuji, and Abi.
     
  19. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Surely Terunofuji must retire now, no former ozeki has ever allowed themselves to be demoted to makushita. It is absolutely humiliating.

    Swami
     
  20. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Natsu Day 14: Kakuryu beats Tochinoshin, takes lead
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 26 May 2018
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    Grand champion Kakuryu defeated sekiwake Tochinoshin and took the sole lead with one day remaining in the Summer Grand Sumo Tournament. Kakuryu (13-1) is now one win ahead of Tochinoshin (12-2), while grand champion Hakuho (11-3) suffered a shocking loss that cost him his chance of a record-extending 41st championship.

    Kakuryu will face fellow Mongolian Hakuho in Sunday's final bout in a bid to win back-to-back championships for the first time in his career.

    The Izutsu stable yokozuna lost to Tochinoshin in March, when the Mongolian won with a 13-2 record. But Kakuryu did not slip up this time and improved his career record against the Georgian to 22-2.

    Tochinoshin surrendered an underarm belt hold to Kakuryu, despite bulldozing him toward the edge of the ring with force. Kakuryu resisted and pushed his opponent back, and hooked his right leg and threw the 169-kilogram Tochinoshin down.

    Tochinoshin, who is all but guaranteed promotion to sumo's second-highest rank of ozeki, had a perfect record here until suffering a loss to No. 4 maegashira Shodai (9-5) on Friday. The 30-year-old Tochinoshin, who is aiming for his second makuuchi division championship after his triumph in January, will face No. 5 Ikioi (8-6) on Sunday.

    In the day's final bout, Hakuho suffered his third loss, and fell two wins back of Kakuryu. Hakuho won three of the six meets in 2017, but had not been able to complete a full tournament this year due to injury.

    Sekiwake Ichinojo secured a winning record after holding onto Hakuho's belt with his left hand and pulling his Mongolian compatriot forward. It was his second win over the yokozuna in their 12 career bouts.

    No. 2 maegashira Abi (7-7), who beat Hakuho on Day 6, forced No. 3 Yutakayama (2-12) out of the ring. The 24-year-old has finished two tournaments with 10-5 records since joining the top makuuchi division in January.

    The Shikoroyama stable wrestler will face No. 8 Yoshikaze (7-7) on Sunday in a bid to post a winning record for his third straight makuuchi division meet.

    The two popular komusubi lost their bouts. Mitakeumi (8-6) was pushed to the edge and thrown out of the ring by Shodai and had to limp back to the locker room.

    Endo (3-9-2) has been winless since making his return to the ring on Monday after missing two days with injury. He was defeated by No. 4 Chiyotairyu (6-8).

    Swami
     
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