2018 Natsu Basho.

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Swami, May 10, 2018.

  1. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Wow, Day 14's final two matches were amazing. I'm impressed with Kakuryu. He just has those yokozuna skills on display. I don't know what I'm more impressed with, Tochinoshin over Hakuho or Kakuryu over Tochinoshin. These final days have been great. I'm glad two of the three yokozuna completed this basho healthy.

    I can't believe Ichinojo beat Hakuho. I enjoy watching Ichinojo but I would never wager money on his performance. He had a great basho.
     
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  2. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Natsu Day 15: Kakuryu holds on to win 2nd straight championship
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    Written by Kyodo
    Category: News
    Published: 27 May 2018
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    Kakuryu defeated rival yokozuna Hakuho to win the Summer Grand Sumo Tournament on Sunday and capture back-to-back championships for the first time in his career. Needing a win to avoid a championship playoff with ozeki-in-waiting Tochinoshin, Kakuryu defeated Hakuho for just the seventh time in their 46 career bouts. The championship is the fifth of Kakuryu's career.

    "Since I became a yokozuna this (two-straight titles) has been a target of mine," Kakuryu said. "Last year was a challenge for me, but so many people believed in me and supported me. The desire to repay them and make them happy has motivated me."

    Hakuho had entered the 15-day tournament at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan looking for his first championship of the year after he had withdrawn in both January and March. But a shock defeat on Saturday left him out of the running.

    Kakuryu (14-1) got the better of Hakuho (11-4) on the initial charge, hooking his left hand under the side of his rival's belt and grabbing the front with his right. Kakuryu forced Hakuho back to the straw only for his opponent to counterattack and return the fight to the center of the ring.

    Although he was able to get strong-looking grips on the back of Kakuryu's belt, Hakuho found himself pressured backward until the unstoppable Kakuryu rocked him out of the ring to secure the championship.

    "This was not the first time I've been in a battle for a championship," Kakuryu said. "I knew I had to focus on my sumo, and I was able to do just that."

    Tochinoshin (13-2), who is virtually assured promotion to ozeki, the sport's second-highest rank, defeated No. 5 maegashira Ikioi (8-7) in the day's penultimate bout. Although he failed to win his second career championship, Tochinoshin received two of the sport's coveted special prizes, his third career Technique Prize and his sixth Fighting Spirit Prize.

    Fighting with a taped-up right wrist he hurt on Friday, Tochinoshin grabbed his favored left-hand overarm grip on the initial charge. With Ikioi distracted by Tochinoshin's left, the sekiwake snuck his right hand onto the maegashira's belt and then hoisted him over the straw bales to set up a thrilling conclusion to the tournament.

    The 30-year-old Tochinoshin won January's New Year Grand Sumo Tournament with a 14-1 record, and earned the Outstanding Performance Award in March, when he finished at 10-5.

    On Sunday, sumo elder Onomatsu, the Japan Sumo Association's judging director, said JSA chairman Hakkaku had agreed to convene a board of directors meeting to discuss Tochinoshin's promotion. To date, no promotion recommendation has been rejected by the board.

    No. 11 maegashira Chiyonokuni (12-3) and makuuchi-division debutant No. 15 Kyokutaisei (10-5), each received a Fighting Spirit Prize, the first special prizes of their careers. No. 2 maegashira Shohozan (8-7), who defeated Kakuryu on Day 4, earned the Outstanding Performance Prize.

    No. 2 maegashira Abi (7-8) finished with his first losing record after going 10-5 his first two grand tournaments in the elite makuuchi division.

    Mitakeumi, demoted to komusubi for this tournament after a lengthy run at sekiwake, appears poised to return to that rank after defeating sekiwake Ichinojo (8-7) and finishing with a 9-6 record.

    Swami
     
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  3. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    All in all, a good basho. A little disappointed that Tochinoshin didn't win the yusho, but 13-2 runner-up is still a good score and ozeki promotion is a done deal.

    Swami
     
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  4. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    That was a great basho! Much respects to Kakuryu. His sumo was impressive, except his henka to Kotoshogiku. I never thought he could beat both Tochinoshin and Hakuho. He deserves the Emperor's Cup.

    Tochinoshin was amazing and I hope he's a powerful and healthy ozeki. He has such a good vibe and sumo spirit. I look forward in seeing his sumo in the second half of the year.

    Glad to see Yoshikaze and Shohozan get their kashi-kochi. Yeah, I agree about Terunofuji. His dramatic drop is humiliating.

    Hopefully we have three healthy yokozuna and three ozeki in July. With Takayasu and Goeido being out or pulling out of this basho do they have to win at least eight matches in July to keep their ozeki title?
     
    Last edited: May 28, 2018
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  5. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Yes, both Takayasu and Goeido must win eight in July to keep their rank.

    Tochinoshin very much a late-bloomer at 30, reminiscent of Kirishima when he moved up to ozeki in early 1990. Kirishima in fact was just a few days short of his 31st birthday when he got promoted.

    Swami
     
  6. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    Juryo promotions and retirees after Natsu Basho
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    Written by Sumoforum
    Category: News
    Published: 03 June 2018
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    Nwe sekitori Churanoumi and Kokonoe oyakata

    The Nihon Sumo Kyokai announced the rikishi that will be promoted to Juryo Division after the Summer meeting. In July there will be two new sekitori, Chiyonoumi and Churanoumi, while Kizenryu comes back to the sumo's second division after two tournaments in Makushita.

    Kokonoe's beya Chiyonoumi (25) will make his debut as sekitori after posting a 4-3 record in May. He came in with quite a bit of fanfare having been part of Nittaidai's last really good team and missing over a year to a major elbow injury. He is the first new Kokonoe sekitori under ex-Chiyotaikai's tutelage and another sekitori from Kochi again, 10 years after Tosayutaka. With him already retired, Toyonoshima mired in Makushita and Tochiozan perhaps entering the twilight of his career, Chiyonoumi might be the sole sekitori representative of the prefecture soon. He is the first - and will probably remain the only - sekitori from the Natsu 2015 class.

    Churanoumi (former Kizaki) is from a university background, Nihon University, as many Kise-beya rikishi are. He's also only the 5th sekitori ever from Okinawa and the third sekitori out of the Haru 2016 class, but the first to have come up from maezumo (the others were sandanme tsukedashi Yutakayama and Asanoyama).

    And Kise's beya Kizenryu (33) will try to get that elusive Juryo kachikoshi. He's had 10 straight losing records when ranked in makushita recently, and hasn't been lower than Ms14 since all the way back in Natsu 2012. This is his ninth Juryo promotion, an all-time record.

    Besides former sekitori Oiwato, Amuru and Masakaze, who announced their retirements before the end of the Natsu Basho, these are the rikishi who called it quit:

    Kotokobai (Sadogatake)
    Takamisato (Azumazeki)
    Kotokensei (Sadogatake)
    Shinfuji (Isegahama)
    Byakkomaru (Tatsunami)
    Takakiho (Takanohana)
    Tosahikari (Isegahama)
    Mienomaru (Musashigawa)
    Arakawa (Michinoku)
    Takada (Futagoyama)
    Asahimaru (Asahiyama)

    Swami
     
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  7. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    I didn't see him on the list of retirees....

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  8. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Superstar

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    I really don't understand the logic in him continuing to continue, he may still be relatively young but the last two tournaments have shown no sign of any spark of a comeback. No former ozeki should ever fall so low.

    Swami
     

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