2019 Hatsu Basho.

Discussion in 'Sports' started by Swami, Jan 13, 2019.

  1. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    Kyushu champ Takakeisho gunning for ozeki promotion at New Year meet
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    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 12 January 2019
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    New sekiwake Takakeisho said he will be targeting promotion to ozeki when enters the ring at the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament kicking off on Sunday.

    Takakeisho, who claimed his first top-division title at November's tourney in Kyushu, will need to once again show off his resilient determination when he squares off against yokozuna Hakuho and ozeki Takayasu, two of 15-day meet's top contenders.

    The 22-year-old Takakeisho ended November's tourney 13-2 with all three grand champions absent and narrowly triumphed over Takayasu, who posted his third 12-3 record of 2018 in the ozeki's quest for a maiden makuuchi title.

    The triumph earned Takakeisho a bump up from komusubi for the first time in his career, and put him in prime position for another promotion down the line. "My goal is ozeki. This year it's do or die," Takakeisho said.

    One of the criteria typically needed for promotion to sumo's second highest rank is 33 combined wins from three tournaments. Takakeisho fell just shy of the mark in November with 32, and would need 11 wins at Tokyo's Ryogoku Kokugikan to meet the target.

    In practice ahead of the tournament, the 175-centimeter tall, 169-kilogram rotund wrestler demonstrated that his trademark strikes, thrusts and shoves remain polished, and he was able to occasionally sidestep attacks without hesitation. "Ideally, I always want to bring full power (to the ring), but it can't be done for all 15 days," he said.

    During Monday's practice in front of the yokozuna council, Takakeisho was overwhelmed by Hakuho. He lost all five of their bouts despite the Mongolian grand champion missing November's meet due to right knee and ankle surgery, earning some candid advice from Japan Sumo Association Chairman Hakkaku that his sumo lacked vigor.

    Defeating the sport's elites will be Takakeisho's key to earning ozeki promotion. Among them, Takakeisho may face a resurgence from Kisenosato as the Japanese yokozuna attempts to bounce back from a devastating 0-4 start to the Kyushu tournament.

    The 32-year-old Japanese grand champion won eight of nine practice bouts Wednesday against Takakeisho, 10 years his junior, but likely has his career on the line after his November performance garnered criticism from the yokozuna council. "I've gotten into good shape," Kisenosato said. "Now I'll just believe in myself and give it everything I've got."

    Kakuryu, who won back-to-back top division titles last year, will also return to the ring after sitting out November's meet due to right ankle pain. The Mongolian yokozuna is seeking his sixth career title.

    Among the ozeki, Takayasu has his sights firmly set on claiming his first top division trophy. "I'm fully prepared and ready to go out and fight for the championship," said Takayasu, who turns 29 in February.

    Kisenosato's junior at the Tagonoura stable, Takayasu is the only fighter under 30 years of age among the three grand champions and three ozeki, an indication of the generational gap in the upper ranks.

    Both 32-year-old Goeido, who won his first title in 2016, along with 31-year-old Georgian Tochinoshin, will be looking for a second top division crown. Both wrestlers barely finished Kyushu's meet with a winning record, Goeido having pulled out on Day 12 with pain in his right arm.

    Among other contenders, Takakeisho's western counterpart Tamawashi will also be competing as a sekiwake for the first time. The Mongolian went 9-6 as a No. 2 maegashira in November.

    Komusubi Myogiryu, who earned a third "kimboshi" prize for defeating struggling Kisenosato in Kyushu, is poised for another solid tournament, while Mitakeumi, Nagoya's champ, will aim to rebound from a losing record and renew talks of his own future as an ozeki.

    Swami
     
  2. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    A huge opening day of upsets, all three ozeki lose and Kisenosato as well.

    Time fast running out for Kisenosato now, unfortunately. If he loses tomorrow that will be curtains.

    Swami
     
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  3. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    Hatsu Day 1: With career in jeopardy, Kisenosato fails to impress
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    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 13 January 2019
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    Yokozuna Kisenosato did nothing to dispel fears Sunday that his career may be over, as he looked powerless in his opening-day loss at the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament at Ryogoku Kokugikan.

    Facing komusubi Mitakeumi, who is trying to rebuild some momentum for a push at promotion to ozeki, Kisenosato generated no power from his legs as he tried to force his opponent out after the opening charge.

    Mitakeumi bided his time as he retreated back toward the straw and timed his counterattack perfectly. He forced Kisenosato upward and got around his right. The yokozuna feebly attempted to throw his tormentor but was easily pushed back out of the ring.

    "I expected him to attack my left, but was able to keep my body moving, and that enabled me to win," said Mitakeumi, a sekiwake for eight of the last nine tournaments, who was demoted after a 7-8 mark in November.

    All three yokozuna were in action on the same day for the first time since Hakuho wrapped up September's grand tournament here with a 15-0 record and both Kakuryu and Kisenosato finished with 10-5 records.

    Prior to the September tourney, Kisenosato had missed all or part of eight straight grand tournaments, and in November he became the first grand champion to lose his first four bouts before he withdrew due to injury.

    Kakuryu, fighting for the first time since then, survived a slight misstep on his charge as Tochiozan dodged the yokozuna. But the top-ranked maegashira squandered his momentary advantage by standing and watching as Kakuryu recovered, pivoted and shoved him from the ring.

    Hakuho, who missed November's tourney and is coming back from knee and ankle surgery, looked like he hadn't missed a beat. He pressured komusubi Myogiryu on the initial charge and slapped him down to defeat.

    November champion and new sekiwake Takakeisho started the 15-day tournament solidly with a win over No. 3 maegashira Shodai, beating him for the sixth time in their eight career bouts.

    The 22-year-old Takakeisho was pushed back at the start but the 27-year-old Shodai had no answer for the sekiwake's high-voltage counterattack. "I'm not young," Shodai said. "I tried to will my body to get going, but I was too slow."

    Fellow sekiwake Tamawashi also opened with a win before the ozeki trio of Takayasu, Tochinoshin and Goeido took to the ring and utterly failed to impress.

    Takayasu, the November runner-up, had to deal with a bout of influenza in the run-up to the tournament. He got off to a quick start against mountainous Mongolian Ichinojo, but lacked the power to push him over the straw. Ichinojo, a No. 1 maegashira following his demotion from sekiwake, counterattacked and ran the ozeki from the ring with a minimum of effort.

    Tochinoshin, who has managed just 22 wins over the previous three tournaments, opened well, but the one-time powerhouse let himself get pushed around the ring and out by No. 2 Hokutofuji.

    Goeido quickly surrendered the advantage in his bout. No. 2 Nishikigi secured an underarm hold with his left hand and let the ozeki expend his energy trying to break free before forcing him out.

    "I'm happy about this. I want to do my best, and try to earn promotion to the 'sanyaku' ranks," Nishikigi said, referring to three ranks below yokozuna.

    Yago, promoted to the makuuchi division after a 10-5 juryo record in November, got his top-flight career off to a winning start with a solid force-out of former juryo rival Meisei.

    Swami
     
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  4. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Wow, not starting good for Kisenosato or the ozaki today. Kisenosato has Ichinojo on Monday. If he can't beat Ichinojo he really isn't wrestling at a yokozuna level anymore. The time for excuses is over. 11 or 12 wins or retire.
     
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  5. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    They certainly haven't given Kisenosato easy matches the first couple of days, I think everything now points to retirement.4

    Swami
     
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  6. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    Hatsu Day 2: Kisenosato's career in peril after 2nd straight loss
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    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 14 January 2019
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    Kisenosato inched closer to the professional precipice with his second straight loss at the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament on Monday.

    The 32-year-old yokozuna, who has been tasked with wrestling well after two injury-plagued years, attacked huge Mongolian Ichinojo (2-0) from the get-go, but never looked like a threat. The 226-kg No. 1 maegashira absorbed the brunt of Kisenosato’s charge before slapping the embattled yokozuna to the sandy surface.

    Kisenosato pulled out of November’s Kyushu tourney after four straight losses and has only finished one of the previous 10 tournaments.

    Sekiwake Takakeisho, who won in Kyushu and could earn promotion to ozeki with 11-plus wins, made short work of dynamic No. 3 maegashira Shohozan (0-2). The clash, between two of the quickest wrestlers in the top makuuchi division, became a straight-up shoving match that Shohozan lacked the power to win.

    “I don’t have his speed so I had to go straight ahead against him,” a modest Takakeisho said after his second win.

    Yokozuna Hakuho, who is returning from knee and ankle surgery after going 15-0 in September, performed some ring-edge magic to improve to 2-0.

    Off balance and in the process of being shoved out of the ring from behind by East No. 1 maegashira Tochiozan (0-2), Hakuho spun away from his pursuer. Somehow the yokozuna managed to bring his right foot back in bounds and plant it on the straw as Tochiozan’s momentum took him out of the ring.

    Komusubi Mitakeumi, who needs a good tournament to reignite his ozeki promotion hopes, shoved yokozuna Kakuryu (1-1) straight out from the opening charge to improve to 2-0 following his easy win over Kisenosato on Sunday. Like Hakuho, Kakuryu missed all of November’s tournament due to injury.

    A day after all three ozeki opened with losses, Takayasu survived a scare to beat Myogiryu (0-2), who nearly dragged him down to defeat. The komusubi’s momentum, however, sent him sailing out of the ring and the decision went to November runner-up Takayasu.

    Tochinoshin (0-2), who stole the spotlight last January when he went 14-1 to win his first title, continues to look like a shadow of his former self.

    Lacking support and strength from his strapped and braced right knee, the Georgian had Nishikigi at his mercy but could not put him away. Instead the East No. 2 maegashira threw out the ozeki to improve to 2-0.

    Goeido also fell to his second loss, losing his grip on Hokutofuji’s belt as he tried to lever him over the straw. The West No. 2 maegashira counterattacked and drove the ozeki from the ring.

    Swami
     
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  7. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Tochinoshin and Goeido are having a tough time to start. I get the impression Tochinoshin isn't fully well. Same too for Kakuryu.

    I feel we are seeing he last matches of Kisenosato's sumo career. It's just so painful to watch. The disappointment on his face says it all. He faces Tochiozan on Tuesday. I just hope he get's it together.
     
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  8. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    I really think Kisenosato should have retired immediately yesterday, instead of prolonging the agony.

    Swami
     
  9. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    Hatsu Day 3: Kisenosato suffers 3rd straight loss
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    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 15 January 2019
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    A 7-second bout may have decided the fate of yokozuna Kisenosato, who suffered his third straight loss of the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament on Tuesday.

    In the penultimate bout at Ryogoku Kokugikan, Kisenosato was quickly dispatched by Tochiozan (1-2) despite going into the match holding a 26-16 record over the top-ranked maegashira.

    The 32-year-old yokozuna attempted an overarm throw against his opponent, but instead found himself at the edge of the straw as Tochiozan swung Kisenosato around and nudged him out.

    The loss was Kisenosato’s eighth straight since September, not counting his forfeit on Day 5 of November’s Kyushu tourney, making it the worst run for a yokozuna since the 15-day grand tournament format began in the summer of 1949.

    If he competes on Wednesday, Kisenosato will face No. 2 Nishikigi for the first time in the top division.

    The majority of the sport’s elites were upset on Day 3, including yokozuna Kakuryu, who suffered his second straight loss.

    Kakuryu was quickly driven back by Nishikigi (3-0), with the rank-and-filer coming out on top in a judgment as both wrestlers appeared to fall out of the ring at the same time.

    Hakuho, however, earned his third straight win with a hard-fought victory against No. 1 Ichinojo (2-1). The yokozuna was taken to the edge by his compatriot after their initial clash, but circled around to the center of the ring to regain his momentum.

    The yokozuna tried to muscle his 226-kg opponent over the straw but Ichinojo held fast. With both wrestlers tiring out, Hakuho showed off his trademark technique and steered Ichinojo out.

    Ozeki Takayasu (1-2), who had the flu prior to the tournament, got off to a solid start in his bout against Hokutofuji (3-0), but was turned around when he was momentarily yanked down by the No. 2 maegashira.

    Giving little room to maneuver, Hokutofuji closed in on the ozeki and forced him out of the ring to keep a spotless record.

    Mitakeumi also remains undefeated after taking down Goeido, who is off to an 0-3 start after withdrawing early at the Kyushu Basho in November.

    The komusubi, hoping to bounce back after being demoted after going 7-8 in November, put Goeido on the back foot from the outset, and flipped the ozeki onto his side when Goeido tried to mount a counterattack.

    Myogiryu got his first win of the meet after defeating ozeki Tochinoshin, who like Goeido suffered his third straight loss. The Georgian looked prime to bounce back from two opening losses, but was stood upright by the komusubi and pushed out.

    In Tuesday’s first upper-ranked bout, Takakeisho won a sekiwake clash with Tamawashi (2-1) to remain undefeated and hand the Mongolian his first loss of the tournament.

    With both wrestlers competing at the sport’s third-highest rank for the first time in their careers, Takakeisho got the better of the initial charge and drove Tamawashi toward the edge of the ring before his opponent rebounded with a powerful return shove.

    Takakeisho dug in and delivered a flurry of low thrusts that sent Tamawashi over the straw.

    Four other lower-ranked wrestlers remain undefeated after three days of action, including No. 5 Aoiyama, No. 6 Onosho, No. 8 Kaisei and No. 15 Chiyonokuni.

    Swami
     
  10. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    That surely is the end for Kisenosato now, although no word of any immediate announcement.

    Swami
     
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  11. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Agreed! Surely this match was one of his last. It's sad to see his struggle after all the effort he put into his career to be a yokozuna. He is scheduled to wrestle Nishkigi on Wednesday.

    I wouldn't be surprised to see Kakuryu pull out over injury if he doesn't bounce back. The ozeki are doing terrible. Tochinoshi seems still recovering from injury and Takayasu is said to be recovering from influenza. I have no idea what is wrong with Goeido.

    I did enjoy the Hakuho vs Ichinojo match today. Takakeisho, Mitakeumi, and Hokutofuji have started off well.
     
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  12. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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  13. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    He was so so unfortunate to get injured the way he did. I did think if he had taken two full tournaments off after March 2017, to get plenty of time to heal, he would have had a better chance to come back. But each time it seemed he was being rushed into returning.

    Swami
     
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  14. Swami

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    Hatsu Day 4: Hakuho stays perfect as Kisenosato dominates headlines
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    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 16 January 2019
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    Yokozuna Hakuho survived a scare against rank-and-file opponent Hokutofuji to remain perfect at the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament at Ryogoku Kokugikan on Wednesday.

    With headlines on the fourth day of the 15-day tournament dominated by the retirement of Japanese yokozuna Kisenosato, the other remaining yokozuna, Mongolian Kakuryu, was also victorious.

    Hakuho, looking to extend his record win total to 42 top-division titles, faced stiffer-than-expected competition against No. 2 maegashira Hokutofuji (3-1), who was looking for a second-straight win against the Mongolian. With both wrestlers slapping and thrusting from the outset, Hokutofuji gained momentum and drove Hakuho to the edge of the straw.

    The maegashira looked set for a thrust-out win as Hakuho teetered on one foot, but the yokozuna refused to fall and managed to slip to the side, executing a downward thrust that sent both men tumbling off the dohyo. After initially ruling Hakuho the winner, the judges confirmed the decision following a conference in the ring.

    Coming off back-to-back losses, Kakuryu (2-2) showed off his typical swiftness off the mark against komusubi Myogiryu (1-3). Kakuryu pushed Myogiryu to the edge after his attempt at a shallow grip was blocked, but the Hyogo Prefecture native was able to evade a push-out. Myogiryu dodged an attempted slap down, but with Kakuryu maintaining momentum, a second attempt at a push-out was successful.

    Ozeki Takayasu, a junior stablemate of Kisenosato and fellow Ibaraki Prefecture native, improved to 2-2 with a rapid-fire win over No. 1 Tochiozan (1-3). Takayasu hit his opponent hard in their initial clash, unleashing a flurry of blows as he quickly drove his way to a victory with a thrusting attack.

    Ozeki Goeido (0-4) continued his nightmare tournament, losing by frontal force-out against top-ranked maegashira Ichinojo in a bout lasting more than one-and-a-half minutes. The 226-kg Ichinojo survived an attempted force-out by Goeido, holding his ground at the edge of the ring. Though the ozeki gained a double inside grip, Ichinojo countered by taking his opponent’s belt with both hands on the outside.

    Each time Goeido tried to muscle his way to victory, the giant Ichinojo stood firm. He eventually used his roughly 60-kg advantage to maneuver the ozeki to the straw and hoist him out backwards. With the win, Ichinojo (3-1) has already notched victories over a yokozuna and two ozeki during the tournament. “I’m in good shape. I just want to stay calm and confident,” Ichinojo said. “If I can get the belt grip, I feel like I’m in control.”

    Another ozeki, the injury-plagued Tochinoshin, also dropped to 0-4 with a loss to Mongolian sekiwake Tamawashi (3-1). Already carrying a nagging knee injury, Tochinoshin hurt his right leg in practice before the tournament. The big Georgian tried to establish an inside position at the jump with his right hand, but Tamawashi fended him off with a stiff arm. As Tamawashi drove forward, Tochinoshin was unable to hold his ground and succumbed to a push-out.

    Komusubi Mitakeumi remained perfect as he handed sekiwake Takakeisho (3-1), winner of the previous grand tournament, his first loss of the meet. Takakeisho, the youngest wrestler in the top division, was looking for payback against Mitakeumi, who was one of only two opponents to beat him last November in Kyushu. Mitakeumi, meanwhile, was seeking to prove a point against a younger wrestler who had leapfrogged him in the race for promotion to ozeki.

    The komusubi opened with a hard charge and maintained his momentum against Takakeisho, thrusting with both hands to drive his opponent out backward.

    Among other rank-and-file wrestlers, No. 15 Chiyonokuni stayed perfect with a thrust-out win over juryo Aminishiki (1-3). No. 6 Onosho and No. 8 Kaisei remain spotless as well after wins against No. 5 Aoiyama (3-1) and No. 7 Daieisho (1-3), respectively.

    No. 2 Nishikigi also improved to 4-0 on Day 4 after winning his scheduled match against Kisenosato by forfeit.

    Swami
     
  15. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Besides the Kisenosato news it was an interesting day. I have enjoyed the matches this basho with Ichinojo. I wish he was like this all the time. It seems as if he gains in rank he gets lazier with his sumo. Goeido did better but still lost. Tochinoshin looks to be hurting, a shame.

    I also wished Hakuho and Hokutofuji could have had a rematch as it was so close.
     
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  16. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    I think both Goeido and Tochinoshin will probably withdraw, although Goeido doesn't seem to be injured - so not sure what his problem is.

    Swami
     
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  17. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    Hatsu Day 5: Hakuho beats Nishikigi in rematch, tied for lead
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    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 17 January 2019
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    Hakuho continued his run of narrow escapes in the first week of the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament, surviving two more close calls Thursday to retain his share of the lead on Day 5.

    The yokozuna’s win over previously unbeaten No. 2 maegashira Nishikigi kept him in a four-way tie for the lead in the 15-day event at Ryogoku Kokugikan. Komusubi Mitakeumi, No. 6 maegashira Onosho and No. 8 Kaisei also ended the day with perfect records.

    Hakuho was ordered to refight his match when the ringside judges overturned the referee’s original declaration that Nishikigi had won. In the rematch, Nishikigi got the better of the opening charge and found himself pursuing the yokozuna around the ring.

    With Hakuho’s heels nearly up against the straw, Nishikigi lowered his right shoulder for a charge into the yokozuna’s midsection. But the 28-year-old telegraphed his move, and though he knocked Hakuho out, the yokozuna was able to execute a perfect overarm throw to send Nishikigi over the straw first.

    Mitakeumi received the charge of sekiwake Tamawashi, who stumbled into a hornet’s nest of slaps, shoves and thrusts. Before he knew what hit him, the Mongolian was being driven back the way he came and out of the ring to his second loss.

    A komusubi following a 7-8 mark in November, Mitakeumi is looking to rebuild his credentials here for another run at promotion to ozeki.

    November champion Takakeisho (4-1), also seen as a future ozeki, shook off Wednesday’s loss to Mitakeumi. The sekiwake attacked with a high-energy combination of slaps and thrusts to propel komusubi Myogiryu (1-4) backward over the straw bales.

    Yokozuna Kakuryu (2-3) repeatedly failed to finish off 226-kg Ichinojo and was eventually forced out. Ichinojo pushed the yokozuna back to the straw twice, only to see his countryman wriggle his way to safety.

    But Kakuryu could neither lever his opponent out nor tip him over. The yokozuna appeared exhausted by this exertion and eventually had no answer for Ichinojo’s bulk in their 36.3-second struggle.

    Ozeki Takayasu suffered his third defeat of the tournament. Takayasu created openings for himself against No. 3 maegashira Shodai (2-3), but lacked the balance and strength needed to finish it and was eventually tipped over at the edge of the ring.

    After Takayasu’s loss, No. 3 Shohozan was handed a win by default after ozeki Tochinoshin’s withdrawal earlier in the day. That left it to winless Goeido to salvage the day for the ozeki rank, and the 32-year-old delivered.

    Goeido (1-4) expertly forced out No. 1 Tochiozan (1-4) on the opening charge, snapping up a belt hold while barely breaking step as he carried his opponent to the edge and forced him over.

    Swami
     
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  18. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    I was so hoping Nishikigi could have pulled off that win over Hakuho, he's done well the the past few bashos. So many mattas. Boy I can't wait to see someone beat Hakuho. I think he's against Shodai on Friday, that is hard to predict. Shodai is so hot and cold.

    Not too surprised to see Tochinoshin withdraw. The other two okezi still seem to struggle.

    Ichinojo must not be afraid to get near the rice-straw bales, or at least for now. His sumo has been very good.

    Kakuryu seems off, must be still nursing an injury.

    As for the yusho race, since Kakuryu isn't looking good I'm hoping Mitakeumi or Takakeisho make it.
     
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  19. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Hero

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    Hakuho will be remarkably fortunate to go unbeaten, all his wins have been touch and go.

    Hard to say who will win this time.

    Swami
     
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  20. Swami

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    Hatsu Day 6: Hakuho keeps share of lead while Kakuryu pulls out of New Year basho
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    Written by Kyodo
    Published: 18 January 2019
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    Mongolian yokozuna Hakuho stayed undefeated to remain in a tie for the lead with rank-and-file wrestler Onosho at the New Year Grand Sumo Tournament on Friday.

    The sole competing grand champion following the retirement of Kisenosato and injury withdrawal of Kakuryu, Hakuho continued his quest for an unprecedented 42nd top-division title by beating No. 3 maegashira Shodai (2-4) on Day 6 of the 15-day tournament. "I can't let up, and once more I feel I have to be a driving force," Hakuho said.

    After a number of close calls at Ryogoku Kokugikan, Hakuho said he made some adjustments and stayed calm in what was arguably his easiest win of the tournament so far against Shodai, who had won only one of their seven previous meetings.

    The No. 3 secured a two-handed "morozashi" grip on the yokozuna's belt after they collided, but Hakuho was unfazed. "I spar against him in practice all the time," he said. Hakuho shook his opponent's left hand off his belt and in the blink of an eye before Shodai could regroup, the match was over. Hakuho had both hands on the maegashira's belt, stayed low and forced his opponent easily over the straw.

    Excluding his forfeit loss when he withdrew from July's tournament on the fourth day, Hakuho has won 24 straight bouts.

    Mongolian Kakuryu earlier in the day pulled out of the tournament because of right ankle pain. He dropped to 2-4 after forfeiting his scheduled bout against No. 2 Hokutofuji (4-2).

    Ozeki Takayasu (3-3) bounced back from his Day 5 loss with a routine frontal force-out win over No. 2 Nishikigi (4-2), who fell to a second straight defeat after an impressive 4-0 start against higher-ranked wrestlers. Takayasu got the upper hand at the jump by taking Nishikigi's belt with a left outside grip. The maegashira tried to counter with an arm-lock throw but had no room to maneuver, allowing Takayasu to easily shove him out.

    After starting the tournament with four straight losses, ozeki Goeido (2-4) achieved back-to-back wins by dispatching No. 3 Shohozan (2-4). The rank-and-file grappler withstood Goeido's powerful opening drive and almost countered with an arm throw, but the ozeki regathered his position near the straw and drove Shohozan out backward.

    Sekiwake Takakeisho, winner of the previous grand tournament in November, dropped to 4-2 with a loss to No. 1 Tochiozan (2-4). Following the opening collision, Tochiozan obtained a strong one-arm belt grip, staying tight as Takekakeisho tried to shake free. As the sekiwake set up for a throw, Tochiozan kept him off balance and pushed him out from behind.

    Komusubi Mitakeumi (5-1) took his first loss at the hands of Myogiryu, apparently suffering a left leg injury in the process. Myogiryu (2-4) opened with a hard charge, quickly forcing Mitakeumi out backward. The komusubi stumbled slightly as he was forced out and hopped down from the raised ring, only to crumple to the floor.

    Mitakeumi was unable to put weight on his left leg and was carted from the competition area in a wheelchair, raising doubts about his ability to continue at the tournament.

    Mongolian sekiwake Tamawashi improved to 4-2 with a rapid-fire frontal push-out victory over the biggest man in the division, No. 1 maegashira Ichinojo (4-2). Tamawashi blitzed his compatriot at the jump, aggressively pushing and shoving the 226-kilogram giant backward. Unable to hold his ground, Ichinojo stepped out under a barrage of blows.

    No. 6 Onosho stayed perfect by pushing out No. 4 Okinoumi (3-3). He has yet to face an opponent from above the rank-and-file and is scheduled to meet Brazilian No. 8 Kaisei on Day 7.

    Kaisei (5-1) relinquished his share of the lead on Day 6 after incurring his first loss of the tournament to No. 11 Sadanoumi (3-3).

    Swami
     
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