Freedom of movement WILL end with Brexit

Discussion in 'UK Politics' started by Mel O'Drama, Jul 27, 2017.

  1. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

    Message Count:
    3,468
    Trophy Points:
    5,561
    Ratings:
    +6,773
    Member Since:
    28th September 2008
    Somewhere out there Nigel Farage is gurning with joy.






    Freedom of movement will end as soon as Britain leaves the EU, the immigration minister has said, as the government prepares a survey on the benefits of migration from the bloc.

    Brandon Lewis also confirmed that the government intends to reduce net migration to the tens of thousands – a promise the Conservatives have failed to keep since taking office in 2010 – though he refused to say when it would be achieved.

    “Free movement of labour ends when we leave the European Union in the spring of 2019. I’ll be very clear about that,” Lewis told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme on Thursday.

    His comments run counter to recent reports that the government was willing to allow freedom of movement to continue during a transitional period lasting three or four years.

    “Obviously, there’s a period of negotiation we’re going through with the European Union at the moment. But we’re very clear that free movement ends. It’s part of the four key principles of the European Union. When we leave, it therefore – by definition – ends,” Lewis said.

    On Wednesday, the home secretary, Amber Rudd set out the government’s plans to investigate the effects of EU migration on the UK, with the report due towards the end of next year.

    Lewis said that a “new system of immigration” would be in place by the time the UK left the EU six months later, though he declined to define what it would look like, saying it would be outlined in a bill to be put before parliament next year.

    But the shadow home secretary, Diane Abbott, said Rudd must commit to publishing the report in full for scrutiny in parliament before any changes to immigration were put in place. She added: “There must be no repeat of the buried Home Office reports into international students, or the Saudi funding of terrorism.”

    Lewis’s comments appeared to mark a shift in the cabinet’s thinking after a senior source indicated a week ago that it was generally accepted that freedom of movement of people for up to four years would be part of a Brexit transition deal.

    The senior cabinet source told the Guardian that ministers hoped to offer some certainty to British businesses by agreeing a two to four-year transitional deal with the EU quickly.

    The announcement days later that the government would look into the benefits of migration, a major issue in the Brexit referendum campaign, was criticised by some as coming a year too late.

    There was also confusion over the government’s migration study after the foreign secretary admitted at a press conference that he was ignorant of it.

    Speaking to reporters in Australia on Thursday, where he was due to conduct trade talks, Boris Johnson said immigration was a positive thing for the country, as long as it was controlled. “I haven’t seen the study you talk of because I’ve been here in Australia for the last couple of days and travelling for the last week but all I can give you is my own views about the value of immigration and the value of having an open approach to it.

    “I say what I have always said, as a society, the city of London benefited massively from having talent come to our shores. We benefit from a large Australian population; I think we had 400,000 French people living in London when I was mayor.”

    But, he said, “that doesn’t mean that you can’t control it [and] that’s all that I think people want to see”.

    Lewis also reiterated the Conservatives’ commitment to their pledge of getting net migration down to a less than 100,000 people per year, calling it a “long-term aim”. But he refused to say when it would be met, claiming that it was impossible to do so while freedom of movement remained.

    The EU’s freedom of movement rules are not absolute and cover people who want to stay for longer than three months who are in employment, self-employment or who can support themselves. It has been argued that this gives EU nations the leeway to require some people to leave.

    “(It is) our determination to see net migration fall to sustainable levels and we think that is around tens of thousands - it’s something we’ve had and continue to have as our long-term aim,” Lewis said.




    https://www.theguardian.com/politic...rexit-says-immigration-minister-brandon-lewis
     
  2. Sarah

    Sarah Super Moderator Staff Member Original Member Since 1998

    Message Count:
    2,997
    Trophy Points:
    5,327
    Location:
    Northern Ireland
    Ratings:
    +3,808
    Member Since:
    1998
    Let's just go back to 1939.....or 1969 in Belfast when nobody could go anywhere anyway. :oops:
     
  3. Angela Channing

    Angela Channing Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,134
    Trophy Points:
    7,960
    Ratings:
    +6,912
    Member Since:
    1999
    Exactly! Does this wretched government even consider the implications of the idiotic right wing rhetoric? No free movement seriously undermines the Northern Ireland Peace Agreement. The truth is they don't care about anyone that doesn't vote for them.
     
  4. Sarah

    Sarah Super Moderator Staff Member Original Member Since 1998

    Message Count:
    2,997
    Trophy Points:
    5,327
    Location:
    Northern Ireland
    Ratings:
    +3,808
    Member Since:
    1998
    The thought of having to take my passport with me to cross the Irish border is just nauseating for me (an Irish person).
     
  5. Angela Channing

    Angela Channing Soap Chat Warrior

    Message Count:
    5,134
    Trophy Points:
    7,960
    Ratings:
    +6,912
    Member Since:
    1999
    Welcome to post Brexit Britain.
     

Share This Page