Ireland Votes to End Abortion Ban in Rebuke to Catholic Church

Discussion in 'Headline News' started by Zable, May 27, 2018.

  1. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Fan

    Message Count:
    433
    Trophy Points:
    277
    Ratings:
    +357
    Ireland Votes to End Abortion Ban in Rebuke to Catholic Church

    DUBLIN — Eire voted decisively to repeal one of many world’s more restrictive abortion bans, sweeping aside generations of conservative patriarchy and dealing the newest in a collection of stinging rebukes to the Roman Catholic Church.


    The surprising landslide, mirrored in the outcomes announced on Saturday, cemented the nation’s liberal shift at a time when right-wing populism is on the rise in Europe and the Trump administration is imposing curbs on abortion rights in the United States. Prior to now three years alone, Eire has installed a gay man as prime minister and has voted in another referendum to allow same-sex marriage.

    However this was a very wrenching difficulty for Irish voters, even for supporters of the measure. And it was not clear until the top that the momentum toward socially liberal policies can be powerful enough to comb away deeply ingrained opposition to abortion.

    “What we've seen immediately actually is a end result of a quiet revolution that’s been happening in Ireland for the previous 10 or 20 years,” Prime Minister Leo Varadkar stated at a counting middle in Dublin before the outcomes of Friday’s vote have been launched, giving an early indication of the ultimate end result.


    “This has been an incredible exercise in democracy,” Mr. Varadkar stated, “and the individuals have spoken and the individuals have stated: We would like a modern structure for a contemporary country, and that we belief ladies and that we respect them to make the appropriate selections and the correct decisions about their very own health care.”


    The “yes” camp took more than 66 % of the vote, in accordance with the official tally, and turnout was about 64 %.


    “Immediately is a tragic day for Eire and for people who consider in genuine human rights,” the deputy chairwoman of one among Ireland’s largest anti-abortion teams, Cora Sherlock, stated in a Twitter message. “The wrestle to defend probably the most weak has not ended at the moment, it’s simply changed.”


    The vote repeals the Eighth Amendment of the Constitution — a 1983 measure that conferred equal rights on the fetus and the mom and banned abortion beneath virtually all circumstances. Before the referendum, the federal government had pledged to cross laws by the top of the yr to allow unrestricted terminations up to 12 weeks if the amendment was set aside.


    The result signaled the top of an era through which hundreds of girls annually had been pressured either to journey abroad or to buy tablets illegally on-line to terminate their pregnancies, risking a 14-year jail sentence. The government has stated that basic practitioners — docs who are the primary port of call for sufferers — might be asked to offer abortions, although they'll still be allowed to rigorously object to termination at their clinics.


    The vote “now means I can do my job with out the worry of going to jail,” stated Grainne McDermott, a physician who works in intensive care in a Dublin hospital.

    Dr. McDermott described one case through which a mom whose life was in peril first needed to comply with a posh procedure involving hospital legal professionals and other medical specialists earlier than obtaining abortion tablets.

    This was the day that the Irish individuals stated “no more,” Mr. Varadkar informed reporters after the outcomes have been announced outdoors Dublin Citadel, a government complicated the place supporters of the “sure” vote gathered to rejoice.


    “No more docs telling their patients there's nothing that may be carried out for them in their very own nation,” he stated. “No extra lonely journeys across the Irish Sea. No more stigma. The veil of secrecy is lifted. No more isolation. The burden of shame is gone.”


    The vote adopted months of soul-searching in a country where the legacy of the Catholic Church remains powerful. It was the newest, and harshest, in a string of rejections of the church’s authority in recent times.


    The church misplaced a lot of its credibility within the wake of scandals involving pedophile clergymen and hundreds of unwed moms who have been positioned into servitude in so-called Magdalene laundries or mental asylums as just lately because the mid-1990s.


    The church was, actually, largely absent from the referendum campaign. Anti-abortion campaigners actively discouraged its participation, preferring to emphasize ethical values and human rights quite than faith, probably to avoid being tarnished by the church-related scandals.

    Through the campaign, the Affiliation of Catholic Clergymen urged its members to not preach politics from the pulpit. The steerage got here after some clergymen had threatened their congregations that they might not be capable of obtain Communion if they voted “sure,” in line with people who attended the Plenty.

    “That is devastating for the Roman Catholic hierarchy,” stated Gail McElroy, professor of politics at Trinity School Dublin. “It is the ultimate nail within the coffin for them. They’re not the pillar of society, and their hopes of re-establishing themselves are gone.”


    Globally, the Catholic Church’s middle of gravity continues to shift away from Europe to Africa and Latin America. Pope Francis, the first pontiff from the New World, has sought to realign the church’s priorities in political discourse, and has typically prioritized financial and environmental issues over divisive cultural ones comparable to abortion and same-sex marriage.


    In August, Francis will visit Ireland for the World Meeting of Households, a gathering held in a unique country each three years, to advertise Catholic household values.


    The outcome caught most observers and voters off guard. Within the remaining weeks main up to the referendum, observers and pollsters had stated that the hole between “sure” and “no” voters had narrowed considerably.


    “I’m very stunned,” stated Theresa Reidy, a professor of politics at the University School Cork who researches referendums.

    “Yes” campaigners targeted heavily on so-called onerous instances faced by ladies, resembling rape or fetal abnormalities. The referendum end result confirmed that many Irish voters agreed that ladies in those circumstances ought to be allowed a selection.

    That shift in angle was pushed partially by outstanding instances, such because the 2012 demise of Savita Halappanavar, who had requested for a termination of her pregnancy but later died of problems from a septic miscarriage. Ms. Halappanavar’s face was printed on placards supporting abortion, and on Saturday morning individuals positioned flowers in front of a mural of her face in Dublin.


    “Individuals began realizing that compassion didn’t match only one aspect,” Ms. Reidy stated.


    The marketing campaign over abortion many years in the past “was initially portrayed in very black-and-white phrases, crude and simplistic phrases like homicide,” Ms. Reidy stated. However in newer years, she added, “the entire challenge has broken aside.” Ladies have talked extra brazenly about abortion, too, tearing down what for a very long time had been thought-about taboo.

    The church’s influence in referendums has been eclipsed over the past decade. In 1983, when the Eighth Modification was voted in, 80 % to 90 % of Irish citizens attended weekly Plenty, she stated. In the present day, that figure is right down to 20 % to 30 %.


    “Ireland has changed an ideal deal in 35 years,” Ms. Reidy stated.


    Activists on each side campaigned relentlessly for months in a debate that set relations at odds over the rights of an unborn baby versus a lady’s proper to regulate her personal physique. There were more philosophical questions, as nicely: When does life begin? When is a fetus a human? Ought to a victim of rape or incest be pressured to carry out a being pregnant?

    Each campaigns got here underneath hearth for utilizing ladies’s private tragedies in an effort to try to sway the vote, and the nation was nearly plastered with indicators displaying ladies or embryos, and, in some situations, grisly footage of babies being minimize out of wombs.

    For a lot of opponents, abortion quantities to murder, while others fear Ireland is dropping its id as a Catholic country.

    “To those who voted no, I know in the present day is just not welcome,” Mr. Varadkar stated. “Chances are you'll feel that the nation has taken the fallacious flip, is not a rustic you recognize. I want to reassure you that Eire continues to be the same country at present because it was before, just a little extra tolerant, open and respectful.”


    For a lot of abortion supporters, the end result was an affirmation of their respect and acceptance by society.


    Ireland “is taking the right steps to separate church and state and to move ahead as a more progressive nation,” stated Conor Flynn, a 22-year-old scholar.


    Una Mullally, an outstanding campaigner for abortion rights, stated the difficulty was more than just a medical process. It’s about how ladies have been oppressed.


    “All of us have underestimated our country,” she stated earlier than breaking down in tears. “I dreamed for individuals to assume like this, however didn’t consider it.”

    Still, many who voted in favor of same-sex marriage and laws easing rules around abortion — similar to allowing ladies to journey overseas to get it — discovered the newest measure a step too far. Abortion continues to be a extremely private situation for a lot of voters, formed by personal experiences reminiscent of miscarriages or fetal abnormalities.

    “We’re a Roman Catholic nation. We don’t consider in taking a life,” stated Michael Eustace, 55. “Go over to England and get it executed there, not right here.”

    Nonetheless, just earlier than slipping his vote into the poll field, he stated, he whispered a prayer for victims of rape and incest, who, had the “yes” vote been rejected, can be barred from having an abortion.

    *****

    Elizabeth Dias contributed reporting.

    Source: http://newsbuzzinfo.com/ireland-votes-to-end-abortion-ban-in-rebuke-to-catholic-church
     
  2. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Fan

    Message Count:
    433
    Trophy Points:
    277
    Ratings:
    +357
    Some highlights:

     
  3. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Fan

    Message Count:
    433
    Trophy Points:
    277
    Ratings:
    +357
    How the Yes and No sides won and lost the abortion referendum By Harry McGee for The Irish Times
    Smiling Savita portraits proclaiming a new reality for Ireland

    Opening excerpt:


    In the last few days of the referendum campaign on the Eight Amendment dozens of small posters appeared around Dublin.

    The image was of Savita Halappanavar, instantly recognisable from her thick dark hair, wide smile, smiling eyes, and the Bindi dot on the forehead. The message contained one word: Yes. They were striking in their simplicity and directness.

    The Savita case (read Kitty Holland’s report from 2012 here) was never too far away from people’s minds during the eight weeks that this extraordinary referendum campaign seeped into Irish public consciousness on doorsteps, in the streets, in the media, or on the airwaves… right up to polling day.

    It was an unusual referendum. All the comparisons and precedents only went so far. The 1983 referendum on abortion was divisive and nasty. This was, in the main, respectful.

    During it, there was speculation that it could be a re-run of the 1995 divorce referendum, where a tight result, helped by bad weather in the west of the country, emerged on the day as did a sharp Dublin/rural split.

    Neither materialised. This time, the rest of the country followed Dublin’s lead. The Yes side’s campaign shared themes with the same-sex marriage referendum in terms of strategy and approach.

    Unlike then, there was a real, vocal, determined and organised opposition, but this could not prevent the landslide that first emerged in late-night exit polls on Friday.

    And another signal achievement this time was that far from shying away from debate, or being turned off by it, the Irish public engaged with the issue more deeply, more intensely than at any time in the past, including 1983.

    1. Beginnings

    Savita Halappanavar was also the start of it. Her death almost six years ago planted the seeds for a campaign that would totally usurp, not just the Eighth Amendment outlawing abortion, but also a core tenet of Irish society that had set Ireland apart from all our neighbours for over a generation.

    The immediate response to her death in late 2012 was the Protection of Life during Pregnancy Act, enacted in early 2014, which led to a serious split in Fine Gael. For those like Ailbhe Smyth, who had spent a lifetime campaigning for change, that law - which caused such a clamour at the time - was not sufficient.

    “A few of us got together in August 2013,” said Smyth. “We needed to expand beyond that and make the argument that this was an issue that was far from settled.”

    In September 2013, 12 organisations came together to form the Coalition to Repeal the Eighth Amendment.
    Full report: https://www.irishtimes.com/news/politics/how-the-yes-and-no-sides-won-and-lost-the-abortion-referendum-1.3509924
     
  4. Angela Channing

    Angela Channing Soap Chat Champian

    Message Count:
    4,692
    Trophy Points:
    7,460
    Ratings:
    +6,197
    Member Since:
    1999
    Well done Ireland. Now Theresa May need to give the people of Northern Ireland the same rights that the republic voted for but she won't because she is too weak and controlled by the DUP.
     
    • Winner Winner x 1
  5. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Fan

    Message Count:
    433
    Trophy Points:
    277
    Ratings:
    +357
    Health, economic development and education are all the responsibilities of the devolved government of Northern Ireland. But that devolved government collapsed about a year-and-a-half ago. N. Ireland’s political parties need to get their shit together ASAP.
     
  6. Emelee

    Emelee Soap Chat Dream Maker

    Message Count:
    1,898
    Trophy Points:
    2,036
    Location:
    Sweden
    Ratings:
    +3,421
    Applause applause, Ireland!!
     
  7. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Fan

    Message Count:
    433
    Trophy Points:
    277
    Ratings:
    +357
    Church leaders dismayed at vote to lift restrictions on abortion By Patsy McGarry for The Irish Times
    'This country is now on the brink of legislating for a liberal abortion regime’

    Ireland has “obliterated” the right to life of the unborn, and now stands on the brink of bringing in a liberal abortion regime, the Catholic primate of all-Ireland, Archbishop Eamon Martin, has declared.

    Speaking on Sunday in Knock in the wake of Saturday’s resounding result, the archbishop said: “We have elevated the right to personal choice above the fundamental right to life itself.”

    The Armagh-based archbishop was one of a number of Catholic Church leaders to express dismay at the decision of voters on Friday to clear the way for abortion legislation.

    He was “deeply saddened that we appear to have obliterated the right to life of all unborn children from our Constitution, and that this country is now on the brink of legislating for a liberal abortion regime”.

    He said faithful Catholics could become despondent, but “it remains as important as ever to affirm the sanctity of all human life”, and that the “taking of the life of any innocent human being is always gravely wrong”.

    Saying that he was “surprised” by the scale of the result, Archbishop of Dublin Diarmuid Martin told The Irish Times the church in Ireland was “now moving into a different stage”

    Young people

    One of the biggest challenges now facing the Catholic Church was how it engages with young people, and whether Catholic-run schools were “delivering for the investment we make in faith development”.

    Speaking after the ordination of four deacons in Maynooth, Archbishop Martin said many would see the result as proof that the church was regarded with “indifference”, and had no more than a marginal role to play in society.

    However, he said the church must “preach the good news in good times and bad”, and be pro-life “not just in words and statements and manifestos, but to be pro-life in deeds”.

    Though he opposed the referendum, Church of Ireland Archbishop of Dublin Michael Jackson hoped for the introduction of a safe system that would “initiate a real and lasting acknowledgement of the unborn in Irish society”.

    Expressing a “profound sense of sadness”, the leaders of the Presbyterian Church urged politicians “to keep the promise they have made to the electorate to make abortions ‘rare’ in Ireland”.

    The Government and the Oireachtas must “ensure that the unborn with disabilities, like Down Syndrome”, are not aborted, saying there was “no place for unrestricted abortion in a society that claims to cherish human life”.

    ‘Legal and rare’

    Leaders of the Methodist Church said the objective must now be “to reduce the rate of abortions as far as humanly possible, but where they are chosen or unavoidable that they are safe, legal and rare”.

    The result “places on the Oireachtas the responsibility of providing an opportunity for careful and sensitive legislation for safe, legal and rare terminations of pregnancy”.

    The Methodist Church looked forward “to contributing to the consideration of such legislation”. It had always opposed abortion on demand, but recognised “that exceptional cases...may give rise to terminations, and we would wish to see these provided for in the new legislation”.

    The Catholic Bishop of Limerick, Dr Brendan Leahy, described the result as “deeply regrettable and chilling for those of us who voted No’.” The result was “the will of the majority of the people, though not all the people. It is a vote, of course, that does not change our position.”

    Source: https://www.irishtimes.com/news/social-affairs/religion-and-beliefs/church-leaders-dismayed-at-vote-to-lift-restrictions-on-abortion-1.3510508
     
  8. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Fan

    Message Count:
    433
    Trophy Points:
    277
    Ratings:
    +357
    All eyes are now on the strength of the new legislation. The Irish Times also reports:

    The abortion legislation to be introduced by the Government after last week’s referendum will “not be of a liberal degree that was forecast by many opposing” the repeal of the Eighth Amendment, the Minister for Justice has said.

    Speaking in Cork, Charlie Flanagan said he expected the Minister for Health, Simon Harris, would update the Cabinet on his legislative plans on Tuesday and that he hoped his colleague would proceed with the work “as speedily as possible”.

    “However, it’s important that the legislation is right so I have no doubt that the preparation of the legislation is going to take a couple of months,” he added. “We need to acknowledge the deeply held personal views on both sides and being clear cut now and to those people on the other side, I would say to them, the legislation will not be of a liberal degree that was forecast by many opposing the referendum.”

    Mr Harris has said he will introduce legislation on reforming the State’s abortion laws in the Dáil before the summer. The legislation would allow for unrestricted terminations up to 12 weeks and restricted abortion in certain circumstances thereafter. The Government had pledged to see the legislation through by Christmas but Mr Harris on Monday said it could pass through the Oireachtas sooner than that.

    Full report: https://www.irishtimes.com/news/health/planned-abortion-law-not-as-liberal-as-no-campaign-claim-flanagan-1.3511101
     
  9. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Fan

    Message Count:
    433
    Trophy Points:
    277
    Ratings:
    +357
    Writer Suzanne Moore says we can make it the responsibility of the “craven” British prime minister and not Stormont’s by positioning abortion as a human rights issue (and not a medical issue).

    But, whose human rights? Women’s, according to her.

    Giving her opinion on abortion in The Guardian*, Ms Moore writes:

    What we do have is a craven Theresa May, a prime minister devoid of principles, propped up by the fundamentalist DUP and the excuse that Stormont is not sitting, as though Westminster could not, if it chose to do so, act on human rights. Women’s rights are human rights or they are meaningless.

    In arguing that, she seems to not believe that the babe in womb is human.

    Ms Moore completes the above paragraph with this:

    To do the right thing, May would have to be unplugged from her life support machine, the DUP. So be it.

    “To do the right thing.” If only it were that easy for human beings to agree what doing the right thing is.

    *Source: https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2018/may/28/theresa-may-northern-ireland-dup-abortion-laws-suzanne-moore
     
  10. Majorfanofshow

    Majorfanofshow Soap Chat Member

    Message Count:
    42
    Trophy Points:
    124
    Location:
    Ny
    Ratings:
    +42
    Last edited: Jun 2, 2018
  11. Emelee

    Emelee Soap Chat Dream Maker

    Message Count:
    1,898
    Trophy Points:
    2,036
    Location:
    Sweden
    Ratings:
    +3,421
    That's great. However, he's still not pro-woman when it comes to female priests. :eek:

    https://www.ncronline.org/news/vatican/pope-francis-confirms-finality-ban-ordaining-women
     
  12. Zable

    Zable Soap Chat Fan

    Message Count:
    433
    Trophy Points:
    277
    Ratings:
    +357
    The 8th amendment to the constitution of Ireland in 1983 was a human rights amendment: it gave both a pregnant woman and her unborn child an equal right to life. In addition, it “ensured that legislation or judicial interpretation would be restricted to allowing abortion in circumstances where the life of a pregnant woman was at risk”, in Wikipedia’s words.

    The referendum approving this (followed by the ratification a month later) was the first step forward – because how could it possibly be a step backwards – for the pro-abortion movement in Ireland for 122 years, since abortion had been criminalised in the country since 1861.

    The Catholic hierarchy, among others, supported this amendment, the 6th Commandment not withstanding.

    There have been other steps forward for the pro-abortion league in Ireland in the years since. Other referendums and amendments to the Irish constitution on abortion matters. But still unrestricted access to abortion was firmly out of reach until the result of Ireland’s referendum of May 25th 2018, which voted in favour of removing the 8th amendment – in essence, taking away the unborn child’s right to life – and replacing the relevant subsection with fresh words: “Provision may be made by law for the regulation of termination of pregnancy.”

    So now, because a human rights amendment has been removed by popular vote, Ireland’s constitution doesn’t prohibit abortion one iota. (Much like removing by popular vote any prohibition in any constitution against the death penalty.)

    Simply, what remains, are all the laws that still criminalize and regulate the termination of a pregnancy – where the real fight has always been.

    Just what has prevented the pro-abortion league from achieving all that it's wanted much sooner? The Church?
     

Share This Page