The Jaws Thread

Discussion in 'Movies' started by Sarah, Nov 10, 2016.

  1. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Well, we do have this thread.
     
  2. darkshadows38

    darkshadows38 Soap Chat Fan

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    oh than how the hell didn't i find it before?thanks
     
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  3. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm just re-reading Peter Benchley's original novel for the umpteenth time.

    The film is so ingrained in my mind that despite Benchley's descriptions of, say, Brody having a bit of a pot belly or Hendricks being a somewhat nasty old 'Nam vet, they all end up looking pretty much as they do in the film: So Brody, Ellen, Vaughn, Meadows, Quint and Mrs Kintner all end up looking like Scheider, Gary, Murray, Gottlieb, Shaw, Fierro.

    There is one major exception. The character of Hooper is so different that he always ends up recast.

    Benchley describes him as a somewhat arrogant monied preppy womaniser with an athletic physique, blonde hair and piercing blue eyes. In my visuals, I can't help casting book Hooper with Peter Benchley himself.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Not that Benchley necessarily has all the attributes described above. But physically he's very close to the description in the book.




    While I remembered the gazpacho and rare butterfly lamb of the first two courses, I'd forgotten that Ellen served coffee ice cream for dessert at the tense dinner party she hosted. Served in a pool of crème de cacao. I wonder if Michael's request was a little nod to this.
     
  4. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Champian

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    Not sure if any of you have seen this or not.



    Swami
     
  5. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    This week marks the 40th Anniversary of Jaws 2, which opened in cinemas on 16th June 1978...

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    How to commemorate the anniversary? Well, I plan to watch the blu-ray in the next couple of weeks (preceded by Jaws, of course). I may also read Hank Searls' novelisation. And perhaps The Jaws 2 Log as it's been a while.
     
  6. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    "Casting" novel characters is such an interesting process!
    Just hate it when the author mentions something like "she shook her blonde hair" on page 300, eventhough (without further description) I simply assumed that the character was supposed to be a brunette. I don't want to recast someone on page 300!
     
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  7. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Absolutely. It's one of those things that seems to just happen naturally for me based on my initial perception of their description, along with their name and the way they speak (though I think it gets to be a little more work as I get older).

    When the character has appeared in other media, that can be a big influence. Adrian Mole, for instance, always looks like Gian Sammarco, even though I read the first two books before I saw the TV series. What's odder is that in the later books where he is a single father who drives an Austin Montego, he still looks pretty much the same in my head as when he was thirteen and three quarters.

    Then there are characters who have appeared in various media looking vastly different. Sometimes I end up with a bit of a composite, but more often than not I settle into one depiction that is closest to how they are in the book.


    Oh god, yes. By that time the visual is hard wired in and it's impossible to adjust. I think I'd have to tune that out for my own sanity, just as I would a typo.
     
  8. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    I usually take a moment to think of the perfect actor for that character (because I read books as if I were watching a mini-series - needless to say, lots of prime time soap icons "feature" in those written stories).
    Oh yes, I totally ignore it. That writer is not going to ruin my enjoyment!:censer:
     
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  9. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Absolutely not. Who do they think they are?! Just because they created the damned character.


    That's a great way of doing it. I have done that myself before now, and I also find myself doing it with details such as "her blue estate car" or "his yellow pullover", coming up with a much more thorough visual to include specific models and designs. Sometimes, the less information that's given the better as it becomes more interactive.


    This has reminded me:

    When I read Jaws when I was young I was very surprised how different it is from the film, with the the mafia subplot and Ellen's sexual encounter with Hooper. I worked out how long a film would be if it followed the book exactly and decided it would be far too long. Then, in all my pre-teen wisdom, I decided that the book would be the perfect source material for Jaws: The Mini Series.

    I'm off the mini-series idea these days, but I have decided that the only way I could ever cope with a Jaws remake would be if they went in a different direction and followed Benchley's book exactly, rather than remaking the film.
     
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  10. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    I have bought and read many novels, but that was a long time ago (1980s). I have no intention to part with them because a) it looks great on the shelves and b) most of them are ready for a re-read (whenever that will happen, 24 hours per day just isn't enough!)
    Sometimes, usually when I'm cleaning the rooms, I randomly pick up one of these novels just to caress that precious printed treasure, and eventhough I do not always remember the entire story, I can still "see" the characters and many scenes (in detail) exactly the way I did 35 years ago. Probably because I had created them myself, with a little help from the writer.
    The reason I mentioned mini-series is because the novels I used to read back then were typical mini-series material, either the historical dramas or the glossy dramas.

    Several classic movies have already gotten the "mini" make-over and I find them very hit-or-miss although I'm sure that had nothing to do with the change of format.
    East Of Eden (1955) had James Dean, but East Of Eden (1981) is as lavish and poignant as the novel.
    The Shining (1980) was a masterpiece, but the mini-series from 1997 was a total drag.
    I have to admit that I have a strong affection for the 1970s zeitgeist: it's that weird combination of natural grittyness and sexy glamour, and no matter how hard they try, it's almost impossible to recapture that particular atmosphere.

    I've watched JAWS on YouTube (very bad quality upload) only for the horror moments and I have to say I was a little disappointed, hence my confusion regarding the popularity of this movie.
    But the way you describe the story and its characters makes me think that the drama is just as important (if not more) than the horror scenes.

    TV is the new Cinema, production-wise the sky is the limit so it would be interesting to see how they would tackle NuJAWS.
    As long as they won't turn it into a neverending seasons-style series (like The Walking Dead).
     
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  11. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I can relate. On every level.


    Being a voracious reader in childhood and early adulthood has done wonders for my imagination, I'm sure. And I've always loved being around books - even the ones I've never read.



    You're right about the human aspect being as important as the horror. Jaws wouldn't be anything like as successful if it wasn't for the casting. And not just the drama - there's a great underlying humour to it. It's all about people, really. That's what makes the moments of horror so effective.

    Not every film is for everyone. Maybe Jaws just isn't your thing. But oh, Willie - it deserves so much more than a bad quality YouTube viewing. Give it a whirl on Blu-ray. There's an incredible amount of blood, sweat and tears that's gone into making it look absolutely wonderful without losing any of that Seventies documentary feel. If you have a surround system, it's also one of the best-sounding BDs out there (7.1 DTS-HD!).



    I've watched it dozens of times over the years on TV, VHS, DVD. Watching it on Blu-ray, I've noticed details (mostly background stuff) that I couldn't see before.




    Not that I'd like to see any kind of remake of Jaws in reality, but if it had to be done I'd be curious to see Benchley's book brought to life in all its salaciousness. Spielberg said

    But the book is the kind of material that seems tailor made for a mini-series. Even more than the film, the book spends a great deal of time on land, so it wouldn't need to be too heavy on SFX. They'd just need to get the tone right for Amity. And the casting, of course.
     
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  12. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    They used a liquid bath to remove the scratches from JAWS. How ironic!
    I don't have a surround system (or any kind of system, it's just me and my headphones) but the idea of listening to "The Typewriter" in 7.1 DTS-HD makes it very tempting![/Cheeky]
    [​IMG]
     
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  13. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    :D

    A little story about The Typewriter. It's not actually in the film. It was composed to be used when Brody types "shark attack" as the cause of death on the report for the first victim, but in the end it was never used.



    For decades, fans speculated about The Typewriter. With little proof that it was even recorded at the time there was some uncertainty that it even existed. It took forty years, but it finally appeared on the 2015 expanded soundtrack from Intrada to great excitement.

    Similarly, the Quint's Death cue was never actually in the film as they decided to just go with the natural sounds of Quint breathing heavily and screaming.

     
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