The language thread

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Mel O'Drama, Oct 20, 2016.

  1. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Being a universal forum, I thought it would be fun to have a space to explore all aspects of that most fascinating of subjects: language.

    From the written word - including grammar and international spellings - to the spoken word where we can discuss accents, unique regional words or expressions.

    Perhaps you've just heard a great new expression. Or discovered you've been mispronouncing a common word (this happens to me often. Or even offen). Here is the place to share about it.

    How about throwing down the gauntlet to international friends and sharing some regional language quizzes?

    We can even work on SoapChat's very own accent challenge by answering some questions about our use of language.
     
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  2. Kevmac

    Kevmac Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    Great idea, Sir..... this should be a giggle as well as educational o_O:D
     
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  3. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    This video made me smile.





    Perhaps Ryan got his British accent down from watching this video (prepare yourself to have fun with your tongue):



    This guy is very good. I think my British English has improved from watching this.
     
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  4. Emelee

    Emelee Soap Chat Enthusiast

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    I just recently found out how to pronounce awry. :eek:
     
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  5. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    I like the French vibrating "R", as in "grrrrrrrrrande" (or purr like Eartha Kitt). It doesn't work with a dry throat.

    In Holland we use both the throat and tongue "R". I've noticed that in English the "R" is usually pronounced as "WR", I think because the tongue doesn't touch the inside of the mouth.
     
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  6. Emelee

    Emelee Soap Chat Enthusiast

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    Do you guys know how to pronounce the letters/vowels Å, Ä, Ö & Ø? :cool:
    Or the German Ü & ß?
     
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  7. Kevmac

    Kevmac Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    ..... I didn't know this @Willie Oleson ... ?

    In an standard English accent there are two types of "R" sound..... the one you mention above, for example, when saying the word "Over" as compared to the harder sounding "R" used in words like "Road" or "Rubbish" or "Right".... You usually use the slightly harder sounding "R" when it's directly followed by a vowel sound. o_O These are called "Rhotic Consonants" in the world of Phonetics, apparently :rolleyes:

    In a Scottish accent, all the "R"s use an even harder (or rolling) sound. o_O

    This was a fun wee video :) I've noticed how Americans seem to think they don't have an accent, when to the rest of us they do. :D American accents are my favourite...

    .... Not a clue, Ms. Emelee.... :oops: But I'm guessing you might..? o_O:D
     
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  8. Emelee

    Emelee Soap Chat Enthusiast

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    Naturally. :) The sounds of them can be found in English, but you just don't spell them with å, ä or ö.

    The Å-sound is found in the words "Always" and "Poor" and in the name "Paul". Guess where... ;)

    The Ä-sound [æ] can be found in words such as "Hair", "Bad", "Sad" and "Pair".

    The Ö-sound [œ] can be found in words such as "Heard", "Herd", "Bird" and "Fur".
    If you watch The Big Bang Theory, they sometimes refer to "Schrödinger's cat", but they always mispronounce it like "Schrodinger". The ö is not pronounced like an o.

    Ø is just another way to write Ö. Like in Norwegian.

    ß is like a double S: Ss. If you can't write ß on your keyboard, it's ok to write ss instead. The color white in German is "weiß". But it's ok to spell it "weiss".

    The German Ü is kinda like the letter Y in some respects. The name "Krüger" is not pronounced "Kroger" or "Kruger", but rather like "Kryger".
    Same with the color "Grün" (green). It's pronounced "Gryn". Long y. Gryyyn.
    But how do you pronounce Y then?! Well... form your lips to say the [oo] sound in "cool". Lips are sticking out. Now instead of saying "oo", keep your lips out there and make an [ee] sound instead. Lips out and "ee". That's your Y and Ü.
     
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  9. Kevmac

    Kevmac Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    Oh, I see... I didn't know that.... :confused:
     
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  10. hatayas

    hatayas Soap Chat Active Member

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    In Hebrew there are letters/ vowels, non Hebrew speakers can't pronounce.
    for example, I had a friend who lived in the U.S for two years, who told me no one knew how to pronounce his name (Tzachi) correctly. They just called him Zack :D

    Also on that topic, Arabs can't pronounce the letter P. They pronounce it as B.
    So, a true story:
    When I was an undergraduate student in the University, I happened to study a course (in English) where the teacher and all the other students were Arabs. One time the teacher said that today we will be learning how to make "Buzzles" on the computer. While all the other students started tapping on their keyboards, I just sat there, wondering what the h*** "Buzzles" mean?! It took me a couple of minutes to figure that the teacher meant that today we will be learning how to make "Puzzles" on the computer. Embarressed, for not understanding her and for sitting there like an idiot while others were working, I started working myself:embarrass:
     
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  11. Mo Mouse

    Mo Mouse Soap Chat Well-Known Member

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    Tell you what, the rozzers turned up last night at the rub-a-dub because somebody had tinkled them to blow the gaff on that tickle someone pulled at Barclay's the other day. The poppy had done a disappearing act and Plod was looking for a collar to feel. Every man and his dog stayed schtum as if they were totally mutton. Plod wasn't happy - you should have seen the look on their boat. Gave the drum a right spin though.
     
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  12. Emelee

    Emelee Soap Chat Enthusiast

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    Kinda like in Finland then. P becomes B. The swear word 'Perkele' is pronounced 'Berkele'. And K sounds a little like a G. And T can often sound like a D.

    Not many Swedes know how to pronounce certain Finnish letters or combinations despite the fact that Finland was part of Sweden for 600 years, up until 1809, and is our neighbour. And we have many Finns in Sweden that mostly emigrated here during the 2nd World War. The island Åland and other parts of Finland are filled with Swedish speaking Finns, so called Sweden-Finns. The Finnish speaking Swedes are called Finland-Swedes. ;)

    I live somewhat close to the Finnish border, plus both my grandmothers were born in Finland, so I'm a little better at pronouncing Finnish words than the avarage Swede. When I say something in Finnish wrong, my mom always corrects me.
     
  13. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I just want to have a little language-related rant here.

    Recently I've had two emails from eBay with the following title:

    What the hell?! "Incase"? Who the hell is allowing this non-word to be sent out to millions of people?


    I implore anyone reading this to think carefully before putting any of the following into a sentence:

    • aswell
    • alot
    • abit
    • anyday
    • intouch
    • instore
    • upto


    And then there's the old misuse of an actual word:
    • everyday ("I eat breakfast everyday")
    • along ("It takes me along time")



    "A", "In" and "As" were three of the first words I was taught when learning to read. It's not rocket science. It's not even High School English. These one syllable words are taught to four year olds as the most basic words in the English language.




    Sadly, I suspect several of these could become accepted usage within my lifetime.
     
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  14. Kevmac

    Kevmac Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    It truly does beggar belief, Mel'... you notice it more and more. Another common favourite appears to be "bear with me"..... ??? rather than "bare with me"...

    You're probably right :(

    Language will always evolve over time but I think due to the sheer speed of today's communication, it's all happening far quicker... and not in a good way:oops:

    I wonder how long it will take for the word "which" to disappear forever...? It always seems to be replaced by "what" :confused: particularly in Scotland.
     
  15. Alexis

    Alexis Soap Chat Superstar

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    I have noticed that a lot of that comes from America.
     
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  16. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    Can't we have both?:oops:
     
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  17. Kevmac

    Kevmac Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    ... :D

    No, William.... you can't :rolleyes:
     
  18. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    Alright then (or is it all right?).

    But before someone mentions that "everytime" does not exist:

    [​IMG] upload_2016-11-6_19-35-25.png

    Yes it does:p
     
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  19. Kevmac

    Kevmac Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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  20. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    A very petty pedant's question: is it ever acceptable - particularly in British-English - to use "likely" as a mid-sentence adverb without a submodifier such as "most", "quite", "more", "very" or "less"?

    I think not, but see it increasingly in British articles. For example, this article posted on a BBC website today quotes a BBC Political Editor as saying (emphasis mine):

    My eyes actually ache from looking at it. I can't make sense of it. The words "will" and "likely" should never be seen next to each other. Surely it needs to be preceded by a submodifier. Or structured to read "is likely to take". Or he could have just replaced likely with "probably" which is a bit more flexible and means much the same thing. It's used with frequency in written articles on the site as well as quotes.

    I was shopping this week and spoke to a salesperson who seemed intelligent and articulate. Suddenly he used likely in this adverbial way with no qualifier. I described an item of furniture I'd seen and liked. His response was: "From your description, it's likely supplied by [x-manufacturer]". It was the first time I've heard it spoken out loud and I found myself needing to leave. Quickly.


    (And breathe. Maybe I could have posted this in the Rant Room).



    The OED says this:

    ...Which I know answers my own question, but I'm curious about people's experiences of hearing it used this way. Am I just old, immutable and behind-the-times?



    A few articles on the subject:

    http://crosstalk.cell.com/blog/youre-probably-confusing-likely-and-probably

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv275.shtml

    https://bridgingtheunbridgeable.com/2012/03/23/likely-adverb-or-adjective/
     
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