The use of the English language on either side of the Atlantic

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Richard Channing, May 4, 2018.

  1. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Enthusiast

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    Well the Irish, both sides, hit their R sounds (darlin, car, farm) in the same way that Americans do, but the English don't* so there's already a connection between the two places

    *There are exceptions, like in the West Country.

    We say both, but it's highly likely we stole Merry from you.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2018
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  2. Alexis

    Alexis Soap Chat Winner

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    But when I am being a nasty piece of work I don't hit any R sounds. It's dahling, Cahh, and fahm. :)
    It's Dynasty's fault.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2018
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  3. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Aluminum vs Aluminium? We in the US use the former but I do like the British way of saying this metal. This word probably sticks out for me as the most different between what side of the Atlantic we are on.
     
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  4. Alexis

    Alexis Soap Chat Winner

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    And it's a Northern Irish thing to say Filim and not Film.
     
  5. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Enthusiast

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    My mam's from Tipperary and she says filim as well (which means I do too).
     
  6. Richard Channing

    Richard Channing Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    Yeah I think the north and all parts of the republic say filim.
     
  7. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    How odd to put the emphasis on the adjective, it makes the two words become one word (redshoes).
    Although it's probably Red Riding Hood? But "riding hood" could have been one word (like, raincoat) so then it still makes sense.
     
  8. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Enthusiast

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    Yeah it does. It's weird, but I kind of like it.

    Yeah, like Knots Landing or The Godfather, the stress seems to land in the middle of the title.
     
  9. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    When we visited Disney World Florida we heard a young girl saying (to her father) "I'm so glad you're my daddy".
    And we were like, OMG we've landed in a sitcom, even the kids talk like tv-kids.

    All the people were so super-friendly - well, we were tourists so... - but I mean they did it so effortlessly, as if it were a second nature.
     
  10. Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I think the kids just watch a lot of TV, and often get their social cues from what they see.
     
  11. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    I guess so, but there's something casual about the Americans' way of displaying affection, therefore it felt as if that little girl confirmed that idea, whether the idea is accurate or not.
     
  12. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Well - I rest my case. This is why I find myself saying "had something to eat".

    :D If it gives you any consolation, the "eight" pronunciation in the UK appears to have been instigated by the social climbing middle classes, trying to differentiate themselves from the working classes without realising most upper class people of the time would also have said "et".

    Also, the Oxford Dictionary has recently started putting the "eight" pronunciation first which means you're in the vast majority.


    It depends. Is there a tannoy over which the phrase "code blue" is regularly uttered? And do medical staff tell you the next twenty four hours will be critical?


    Many people I know in the UK say "merry Christmas" even though we never use the term "merry" in any other context anymore.

    I usually lean towards "happy Christmas" because of the drunken connotations of "merry".
     
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  13. Emelee

    Emelee Soap Chat Enthusiast

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    Not that anyone cares, but I speak with an American accent when speaking English. I blame growing up watching mostly American TV series. School teachers teaching English over here tend to speak British English, almost forcing it upon their students/pupils. However, most kids over here prefer American. The less polite sounding accent of the two. They hate the overly polite tone because Swedes aren't nearly as formal and polite in writing or speaking as either US/UK. We don't use titles such as Sir/Madam or Mr/Mrs. We call our bosses at work by their first name. We end very formal letters as well as informal ones with the standard "Mvh" (Med vänliga hälsningar) which translates "With friendy greetings".

    Those who enjoy being a bit posh use British English though. However, they often sound as though they are trying too hard, somewhat over the top. Because of that, I just want to roll my eyes when I hear a Swede speaking with a thick British accent.
     
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  14. Richard Channing

    Richard Channing Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    Phew! That is a relief. Maybe I'm not so common after all. Although I'd probably say "I ate me breakfast", so maybe I am. :D

    They might also say things like "It's too early to tell" and "we're doing everything we can".
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2018
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  15. Richard Channing

    Richard Channing Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    One thing I am struck by in my almost daily Judge Judy viewings is the word 'had' been used it all kinds of places it shouldn't be with the majority of the people on there. In fact it's thrown just about everywhere when referring to the past.

    "What had happened was...."
    "That's what she had said...."

    Not sure when this started to happen, or why it's caught on, but it's an epidemic!
     
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  16. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    I think it also take less effort to speak American as you can pronounce the words the way the are written.
    Most if not all continental european languages have a strong "r", so it's against our nature to omit the pronunciation of that "r" and replace it with the British "-h".
    Of course that doesn't mean that you have to use a redneck American accent.

    The little English I speak comes with a very thick Eurropean accent. "Welcome, misterrr Bond".
     
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  17. Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery Super Moderator Staff Member

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    It's one of those "filler words" that people toss in as they babble. It's right up there with "like," "y'know," and "okay?", only it can occasionally connect to what's being said. Verb/subject agreement seems to be one of the least-emphasized problems in American schools (right up there with terrible spelling, IMO).
     
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  18. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Enthusiast

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    We say perfume, you say perfume.
     
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  19. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    Just wondering, is there a connection with French language?
     
  20. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Enthusiast

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    Je ne c'est pas!

    I think it's telling that Americans tend to hit the last syllable and Brits go for the first. It makes them sound more forward thinking, more go-getting - they "follow through" to the end of the word (or the idea). We start off well and then just ... trail off.
     

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