The use of the English language on either side of the Atlantic

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Richard Channing, May 4, 2018.

  1. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    And it makes the American pronunciation more laidback, I think. There's a kind of forcefulness about British English that gives me the idea that at the end of the sentense the person who speaks that sentense is slightly out of breath, while an American could comfortably babble on.
     
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  2. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Great observation. :ig:

    LOL, we Americans are good babblers. :D
     
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  3. Alexis

    Alexis Soap Chat Winner

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    @Snarky's Ghost once described Joan Collins' Alexis dialogue in just that way.
     
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  4. Richard Channing

    Richard Channing Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    Americans say Moscow with a full 'cow' at the end whereas this side of the Atlantic they pronounce in Mosco.

    Also whereas Americans tend to pronounce flan and Milan like f-lon and Mi-lon in the UK its Fl-anne and Mil-anne.
     
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  5. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    Three off the top of my head-

    Neither - NIGH-thuh (UK) vs. NEE-thuh (US)
    Schedule- SHED-jool (UK) vs. SKED-jool (US)
    Vitamin- VIT-uh-min (UK) vs. VAI-tuh-min (US)
     
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  6. James from London

    James from London Soap Chat Dream Maker

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    Neither - NIGH-thuh (UK) vs. NEE-thuh (US)

    Actually, I've noticed that we (UK) say both. As far as I can tell, it doesn't seem to be either/eether a regional or a class thing, but it must be a something thing.
     
    Last edited: May 19, 2018
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  7. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    Is that a language oddity because I can't think of any other English word with the "sch" being pronounced as "sh".
    Incidentally, the North-European "ch" is a "g", but since that's also not used in English language it's kinda irrelevant.
    Not so irrelevant is the fact that I heard "schedule" for the first time when I was watching Howards' Way - again incidentally, temptingly misspelled as Howard's Way - and I'm sure it was Charles Frere who said it. And I remember thinking "shedjool, how odd!"
     
  8. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    This one has puzzled me, too.



    As with the "neither" example, I hear both in the UK. As a (very) general rule of thumb I hear the "sked" pronunciation more in the North of England and from younger people countrywide.



    Ah - Charles Frere. Doesn't he speak nicely?!

    Speaking of, I recall being very surprised to hear the word "vacation" (as in holiday) used in an episode of HW. If memory serves it may have been Mr Frere who used it. After the fact, I thought perhaps he was being very traditional, since many words and pronunciation that are now widely considered "American" were in widespread use in the UK in times past, until our languages evolved in different ways.
     
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  9. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    I've been watching some "th" pronunciation tutorials again, don't know why, I guess I felt like being tutored and tortured.
    But I *will* master it, somehow, someday.
    Never gonna give thee up, never gonna let thee down.
     
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  10. Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery Super Moderator Staff Member

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    There's the whole "Aunt" divide: In the north and Midwest, I hear mostly "Aaahnt", but here in the south, it's "ant" (like the insect).

    I'm not sure if it is just a Southern thing, but from the day you are born until the day you or she dies, you address her as "Aunt___," even if the two of you are elderly--you never drop the "Aunt" (or "Uncle"). Calling an aunt by her first name alone is just fffffffffreaky.

    The noun "envelope" gets even more complicated, when I say "IN-vuh-lope," and other parts of the US say "AAHN-vuh-lope," though the pronunciation is not as exclusively regional as some words. Add the variant "envelop" (the verb, meaning to coat, wrap, seal, etc.) which everyone seems to agree is pronounced "in-VELL-up".
     
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  11. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    We also do it with cousin, and niece and nephew.
     
  12. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    The night before last I was watching an episode of Last Of The Summer Wine (sitcom set in the North of England) in which two of the women observed ants carrying items back and forth. "If they were called 'uncles'", observed one of them, "they'd never get any work done." It took me about thirty seconds to get the (rather sexist) joke.

    We have a similar pronunciation divide here, too. In the place I grew up, "Ant" is heard fairly often.


    It's the same here. Coming from a huge family, I have many aunts and uncles and there's about a 50/50 split in those who I, my sibling and cousins use the prefix with and those we don't. I'm not sure how that's happened, but I think it's the preference of the aunt or uncle in question.


    Wow. That's great.

    Thinking about it, I used to refer to several of our older neighbours as aunts and uncles out of deference when I was young.



    The UK equivalents of this would be "ENN-vuh-lope" and "ON-vuh-lope". I use the former. The latter pseudo-French pronunciation sounds a little contrived to my ears. Kind of like when Brits pretentiously pronounce Porsche with two syllables when it's always been perfectly acceptable to Anglicise it and use just one.
     
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  13. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    Ooh...........ha ha!
    And some progressive people call their parents by their names instead of mother/father (mom/dad). It always makes me cringe a little bit, even if it happens on TV.
    Sorry, I lied. That's one thing I can do very well in any language (*villainous grin*)
    Same here, the original French enveloppe (aahnvelop) has been bastardized to ennvulop - although "bastardize" seems a bit harsh in this context.
    He, names and brands is almost like a new topic altogether, and an hilarious one if I may say so.
    I'll never forget the first time I read the name Penelope: "Pay-nu-loo-puh??" What kind of name is that? Or is it family of the antelope?
     
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  14. Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'd always heard/said "Porsh" until I moved to south Florida, where the hoity-toity who actually own a Porsche (or just aspire to own one) make a point of calling it a "POR-shuh". I mockingly say "por-SHUHHHHHHH" if asked. The nouveau-riche of South Florida are so much fun to mock.
     
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  15. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I'm gullible in any language, so we're quite the pair.


    Oh, I don't know.


    Yes indeed. The great "Nestlé" debate could keep us going for pages. Or not.


    Ha!! Take that, hoity toity.

    You could throw in a "poor-ski" next time. Just to mix it up a bit.
     
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  16. Seaviewer

    Seaviewer Soap Chat Addict

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    Here's an Australian perspective, or maybe it's just my perspective...
    Emphasis always used to be on the second word but I notice that it has been changing.
    I agree. Emphasising the adjective makes it sound as though you're drawing a distinction - the red shoes as opposed to ... the green shoes?
    When I was growing up it was "shedule" and if you said "schedule" they said you were trying to sound American. Now it has reversed and if you say "shedule" they say you are trying to sound English.
    We always emphasised the first but pronounced it DINasty.

    Knots Landing, Falcon Crest. Falcon.

    Australians don't.
    Aluminium. And it's always intrigued me how Americans actually drop the second I from the spelling, not just the pronunciation.

    Perfume. But there are songs where the notes force you to sing it the other way.
    Mosco.
    Same.
    Aaahnt. It was always 'ant' on US shows when I was growing up but now they mostly seem to say it our way.
    Same.

    We tend to add a possessive S to brand names. So much so that the department store Myer made a point of it NOT being Myer's. The chocolate company was always "Nestle's" (to rhyme with pestle) but more recently has become "Nesslay".
     
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  17. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Brits do that a heck of a lot, especially with supermarkets and department stores. Sainsbury's actually use a possessive 's', but it's not uncommon to hear people talk about Tesco's, Asda's, Marks & Spencer's (that is, when it's not shortened to "Marks", "Marksies" or just "M and S").

    Waitrose seems to be an exception. I've never heard anyone say they've been to "Waitrose's". While Morrisons and Debenhams get a break as they end in an 's'.
     
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  18. Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Older people (like my parents) will even say "WalMarts," as in "I went to WalMarts yesterday," which is all sorts of wrong. "JCPenney's" is passable since it's kind of like saying "I went to JC Penney's store" (as if we know Mr. Penney or something). But nobody has the surname WalMart that I know of. Better we just call it Wally World. :D

    And of course there's Target. I prefer the "Tar-JHAYYY" affectation.
     
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  19. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson drilling for soap

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    Correct[​IMG]

    We often put "de" ("the") before any store's name - e.g. I'm going to the (Marks & Spencer, MacDonalds, Waitrose, Walmart, Lidl etc etc)
    Do English people do that too?
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2018
  20. Michelle Stevens

    Michelle Stevens 'The Lovely Michelle'

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    It sounds so much more upscale saying that way. :)
     
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