The use of the English language on either side of the Atlantic

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Richard Channing, May 4, 2018.

  1. Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Not when you're saying the store's name. If you are more general ("I'm going to the store" or "I'm going to the mall"), then having the "the" sounds right. The only reason I might add a "the" would be if there are more than one nearby and I needed to differentiate ("I'm going to the McDonalds on Main Street", as opposed to the one on Elm Street, etc.) but even that is rare.
     
  2. Seaviewer

    Seaviewer Soap Chat Addict

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    What about baseball expressions?

    Some have strangely become part of the Australian vernacular despite the fact that the game itself is not played here that much.

    Is the same true in England?

    For example, "out of left field", meaning unexpected, and especially "stepping up to the plate", meaning to take responsibility, when, as a cricketing nation, one would expect the phrase to be "stepping up to the crease".
     
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  3. Swami

    Swami Soap Chat Champian

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    The man who undoubtedly mangles the English language worst of all is golfer Graeme McDowell who, despite coming from Portrush near me, for some unknown reason has decided to invent the most hideously contrived American accent - nobody anywhere in the world can understand what he says. Any conversation he comes out with consists almost entirely of "Like I said, you know, I woke up you know) and it really is awful.

    If he had any pride in where he came from he wouldn't be doing this. I spent three years at university in Southampton and while I am extremely proud of getting my degree, I am prouder still that I didn't lose my native accent or end up speaking like a robot.

    Honestly, every time you hear McDowell it is just ridiculous. He was on a flight to Edinburgh with me a few weeks ago, and even the cabin crew couldn't work out what he was trying to say.

    Swami
     
  4. Mel O'Drama

    Mel O'Drama Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I've heard both of these in the UK. I've even used the former on occasion (though I probably had a word with myself about it afterwards).

    Other baseball phrases I've heard here include "knock it out of the park" for someone that does an incredibly good job and "play ball" to describe someone who behaves the way they are expected (or demanded) to by the other party.
     
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  5. Richard Channing

    Richard Channing Soap Chat TV Fanatic

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    Not a baseball phrase specifically, but sports related, is to "take a raincheck", as a way to say "not today, but maybe another day." Commonly used in the US but it hasn't really caught on across the pond.
     

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