'The world is watching': GOP braces for potential upset in Pennsylvania special election

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    'The world is watching': GOP braces for potential upset in Pennsylvania special election
    Republicans are in the final hours of their frantic, all-out bid to save a Pennsylvania congressional district in the heart of Trump country from falling into Democratic hands in Tuesday's special election.

    Democrat Conor Lamb, a 33-year-old Marine veteran and former prosecutor, holds a slight lead among likely voters over Republican state Rep. Rick Saccone, a Monmouth University poll released on the eve of the 18th District election shows.

    It's left the GOP bracing for what would be its most embarrassing — and ominous — loss since Donald Trump took office. Republicans have spent more than $10 million to prevent a defeat in the district, which Trump won in 2016 by 20 percentage points.

    If Lamb wins, or even comes close, it will be a signal that Republicans are in danger even in districts where Trump was won handily in 2016, and raise Democratic hopes of capturing the House and Senate this fall. The race would also serve as a model for Democrats running in deep-red districts across the country.

    "The world is watching," Trump said in an appearance in the district Saturday night, upping the pressure for Saccone to deliver on Tuesday.

    The race is all about the psychological fallout.

    Republicans have suffered major losses during Trump's presidency, including a blowout in the Virginia gubernatorial race and a loss in Alabama's Senate race.

    But those races were more easily explained. The GOP already knows the suburban areas where they were walloped in Virginia are at risk, and in Alabama, Roy Moore faced credible accusations of child molestation. A series of 39 red-to-blue flips in state legislative races got less national attention, though they continued to show an enthusiastic Democratic base. And the party had managed to hold on in House races, including one in the Atlanta suburbs last spring.

    Western Pennsylvania is different.

    It's a white, blue-collar region that has overwhelmingly backed Republicans in recent presidential elections. And, unlike last year's contests, Republicans now can tout the tax bill that they had hoped would be a persuasive selling point in key races.

    Particularly worrying for Republicans is that Lamb has managed to parry the attacks they've hoped will work across the map. He aired a television ad noting that he opposes House Democratic leader Nancy Pelosi, who is deeply unpopular with conservative voters.

    Lamb has run to the right of most Democrats on a series of issues. He's said he personally opposes abortion. His first campaign ad featured him shooting a semiautomatic rifle, and he's opposed new gun control measures in the wake of the Parkland, Florida, shootings. He's also supported Trump's steel tariffs, muting what the President hoped would be a major selling point for Saccone.

    National Republicans have done everything possible to save the district.

    Trump visited twice, including a rally Saturday night where he spoke for 75 minutes and whipped supporters up to back Saccone.

    "This guy should win easily," Trump said, pointing to the size of his own victory there.

    Vice President Mike Pence, Donald Trump Jr., top White House aide Kellyanne Conway and other senior Republicans visited the district, too.

    House Republicans poured cash onto the Pittsburgh airways and into get-out-the-vote programs. The National Republican Congressional Committee spent $3.5 million. The Congressional Leadership Fund, a super PAC aligned with House Speaker Paul Ryan, spent $3.3 million. The Republican National Committee chipped in $1.1 million and ran a massive field program, while the Trump-aligned super PAC America First Action spent $1 million.

    Democrats, meanwhile, spent relatively little: Patriot Majority PAC spent $450,000 and Vote Vets spent $344,000. Several other groups spent smaller amounts, largely on digital advertising. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee spent $260,000 on television advertising.

    The lower Democratic spending was in part because the party is gearing up for dozens of races in districts with a recent history of voting more Democratic in presidential races this fall — and in part because they didn't need to spend money to back Lamb. He outraised Saccone by a nearly five-to-one margin, hauling in $3 million by the most recent campaign finance reports filed February 21.

    Fearful of a loss, Republicans are downplaying expectations and trashing Saccone as a candidate.

    The GOP's attempt to downplay the race's importance appears to center on two key factors: Saccone's weak candidacy, explained through his paltry fundraising, and the district's Democratic voter registration advantage, even though that edge isn't reflected in its recent presidential or congressional voting history.

    Trump has closely followed the race for weeks and received multiple briefings on it last week, a senior White House official said.

    The official said Trump views Saccone as a weak candidate and is aware that he's struggled to raise money — but that Trump went into his rally Saturday hoping to move the needle for Saccone with his base of blue-collar supporters, particularly in the wake of his steel tariff announcement.

    When Trump stood on stage with Saccone in Moon Township on Saturday, he made clear the pressure for a GOP win Tuesday.

    "I hate to put this pressure on you, Rick," Trump said. "They're all watching because I won this district, like, by 22 points. It's a lot. That's why I'm here. Look at all those red hats, Rick."

    'The world is watching': GOP braces for potential upset in Pennsylvania special election - CNN Politics https://apple.news/AaHexDrRZQ568RFUb6Tb1-Q
     
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    What to watch in the Pennsylvania special election
    Voters in southwest Pennsylvania are heading to the polls Tuesday for a special election. Democrats, looking to take back the majority in Congress next year, are hoping a high-profile win in Pennsylvania's 18th District will give them a boost in the heart of Trump country. Republicans are hoping to avoid an embarrassing defeat in a district that has voted Republican since 2002.

    Here's what you need to know:
    • Polls in the district are open from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. EDT.
    • The candidates -- Democrat Conor Lamb and Republican Rick Saccone -- are in a tough fight in which outside groups have spent over $12 million.
    • The seat opened up when former GOP Rep. Tim Murphy resigned in October after the anti-abortion Republican allegedly urged a woman he was having an affair with to have an abortion.
    • President Donald Trump won the district by about 20 points in 2016. A defeat for Republicans here won't only be embarrassing symbolically, it also will send shock waves to vulnerable Republicans around the country and could spur retirements by other Republicans in Congress.
    • An automatic recount will occur if the margin between the candidates is 0.5% or less. Recounts by permits and partial recounts are allowed as well.
    Here's a closer look at what to watch tonight (and after):

    THE "W" WORD: Democrats are eager to call 2018 a wave year in which they'll take back the majority in the House, and possibly the Senate. It's too early to make that call now, but if Lamb wins, it will bolster Democrats in districts that seem out of reach both due to their political makeup and fundraising. They can gain some major "Mo"(mentum) here tonight that could help bring in a big "W" in November.

    THE DISTRICT WILL LIKELY DISAPPEAR: If you thought $12 million being spent by outside groups on one special election race that won't immediately change the power dynamics on Capitol Hill was crazy, consider this: The district will likely disappear in November! The Pennsylvania Supreme Court ruled the current congressional map unconstitutional and created a new one after the governor and Legislature failed to agree on how to change it. The area has been split up into different districts beginning next year, which illustrates just how seriously both sides are taking this race.

    WHICH SURROGATE MADE THE BIGGEST IMPACT: Trump, Vice President Mike Pence and former Vice President Joe Biden all campaigned here for the candidates. They will certainly hit the trail for more candidates between now and November, but how and where they campaign next could change after the votes are counted in Pennsylvania's 18th.

    THE BLAME GAME: If Republicans lose tonight, they will call Saccone a poor candidate who couldn't fundraise and didn't define himself early enough. If Democrats lose, they'll point to the district's history and call a close race a win for them anyway (though Democrats have flipped 39 state legislative seats since Trump took office, they haven't been able to do it for a congressional seat).

    What to watch in the Pennsylvania special election - CNN Politics https://apple.news/ASvr_YpV1Q-GXoozWewiawA
     
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    Liberals have 'hatred for our country' and 'hatred for God': Republican candidate slams Democrats on the eve of Pennsylvania's special election
    • Pennsylvania state Rep. Rick Saccone, the Republican candidate in the special election for Pennsylvania's 18th Congressional District, railed against liberals during a rally on Monday.
    • He reportedly accused them of being "energized for hate for our president" and that they "have a hatred for God"
    • The election will be held on Tuesday.
    Pennsylvania state Rep. Rick Saccone, the Republican candidate in the special election for Pennsylvania's 18th Congressional District, reportedly accused the Democratic party of being galvanized by "hatred for our country" and "hatred for God," during a rally in Elizabeth, Pennsylvania on Monday.

    Saccone, who was endorsed by and campaigned with President Donald Trump on Saturday, continued the campaign trail with Donald Trump Jr. on the eve of the election.

    "They say the other side is energized," Saccone reportedly said. "Let me tell you, they're energized for hate for our president. They have a hatred for our president."

    Saccone then suggested that liberals founded their ideals on the basis of hating religion and the US.

    "I've talked to so many of these on the left," Saccone said. "And they have a hatred for our president. I tell you, many of them have a hatred for our country."

    "I'll tell you some more - my wife and I saw it again today, they have a hatred for God," Saccone continued.

    Saccone's heated rhetoric was overshadowed by a newly released poll indicating his opponent, Democrat Conor Lamb, was leading by a wide margin. The Monmouth University poll found that Lamb, a former US Marine and federal prosecutor, was 6-points ahead of Saccone.

    The poll also predicted Lamb holds a 49 to 47% edge over Saccone in historical midterm turnout levels, and a 51% to 44% lead in turnouts similar to a presidential election.

    Monmouth's poll last month projected Saccone in the lead.

    But Trump Jr. appeared to disregard the poll's results: "Don't believe this nonsense polling stuff," he reportedly said.

    The election will be held on Tuesday.

    Liberals have 'hatred for our country' and 'hatred for God': Republican candidate slams Democrats on the eve of Pennsylvania's special election - Business Insider https://apple.news/AMSgy_l0UQM6XB2Ee8NXGOg
     
    Last edited: Mar 13, 2018
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    Pennsylvania House Race, in a District Trump Won by 20 Points, Is Too Close to Call

    CANONSBURG, Pa. — The Democrat and Republican in a special House election in the heart of Pennsylvania’s Trump country were divided by a few hundred votes in a race that was too close to call early Wednesday — an ominous sign for Republicans in a district that Donald J. Trump won by nearly 20 percentage points.

    With 100 percent of votes counted, Conor Lamb, a Democrat, was clinging to a 579-vote lead over Rick Saccone, a Republican. But a few thousand absentee ballots had not yet been counted, suggesting that no winner would be declared until later in the day, at the earliest. And it was possible that a legal battle could ensue.

    Taking the stage to applause at 12:45 a.m., Mr. Lamb was introduced as “Congressman-elect” and exulted, “It took a little longer than we thought, but we did it!”

    House Democrats also did not wait for a final count to claim victory, and House Republicans were already talking about a legal challenge. Under Pennsylvania law, there is no automatic recount in such a race, no matter how close.

    But no matter the final outcome, Mr. Lamb’s strong showing demonstrated that the Trump-inspired energy propelling Democrats across the country is not confined to liberal-leaning regions. Republicans were left with the prospect of defending a far broader range of districts this fall than they had hoped.

    A first-time candidate and former Marine, Mr. Lamb, 33, forced Republicans to pour over $10 million into a southwestern Pennsylvania district where Democrats did not even field a candidate in the past two congressional elections.

    Yet whoever wins here may not hold the seat for very long. The State Supreme Court ruled in January that Pennsylvania’s House map was gerrymandered unlawfully and redrew congressional boundaries that may cause either candidate to run in a new district in November.

    Ephemeral as any ultimate victory may be, this contest evolved into a test for both major parties in Trump country. Republicans scrambled to prop up Mr. Saccone, a 60-year-old state representative, mindful that a failure here would send signals well beyond Pittsburgh.

    The president appeared twice with Mr. Saccone, most recently at an airport rally on Saturday night in which Mr. Trump mocked Mr. Lamb as “Lamb the sham” and pleaded for voters to support Mr. Saccone. But Mr. Trump also delivered a rambling, 75-minute speech that careened away from the matter at hand.

    Republicans concede that they will be unable to keep the 2018 battlefield limited to a few dozen districts, mainly in coastal suburbs where Mr. Trump is intensely unpopular. With a deepening mood of pessimism and fear in Washington, they may be hard-pressed to tackle additional contentious legislation this year.

    Even before the returns were counted, Republican officials began criticizing Mr. Saccone’s candidacy in a district where the anti-abortion Republican previously holding the seat, Tim Murphy, was forced to resign after a woman with whom he was having an affair said he pressed her to have an abortion.

    But three months after suffering an embarrassing defeat in the special Alabama Senate election, Mr. Trump and his administration once more put their prestige on the line on friendly terrain. By continuing to aggressively compete even as Mr. Lamb was surging, Republicans tested the potency of two of their most fearsome political weapons for the midterm campaigns: their fund-raising advantage and the deep unpopularity of Representative Nancy Pelosi, the House Democratic leader.

    Outside organizations sought to derail Mr. Lamb with attacks on his record as a federal prosecutor and claims that he would, as one ad put it, merely be a sheep for Ms. Pelosi.

    But the spending did not put the race away, in part because Mr. Lamb pre-emptively inoculated himself against the Pelosi offensive by stating early in the campaign that he would not support her for leader.

    Along with his military service and support for gun rights, Mr. Lamb’s opposition to Ms. Pelosi, which he highlighted in a TV ad, helped him win over some of the voters who were raised Democrats but have drifted to the Republican Party in this heavily unionized district.

    His approach may signal to other Democrats that they can pursue more moderate swing voters without sacrificing the support of the party’s liberal base, at least in districts that will tolerate deviations from party orthodoxy.

    Mr. Lamb confronted a furious attempt by conservatives to retain the seat. In addition to Mr. Trump’s two visits, Vice President Mike Pence appeared with Mr. Saccone, and two of the president’s children did as well, with Donald Trump Jr. here on Monday. Other administration officials also descended on the district, backed up by an advertising offensive by outside Republican groups that began in January.

    Few Republicans publicly said Mr. Trump was at fault for the race’s closeness. But their difficulties here, coming mere hours after he abruptly fired Secretary of State Rex W. Tillerson, illustrated how much his chaotic governing style and divisive conduct has unsettled the electorate and presented Democrats the chance to portray themselves as a political safe harbor.

    In his remarks early Wednesday morning, Mr. Lamb said, “People are so tired of the shouting on TV and in our politics.”

    Mr. Lamb ran a fairly cautious campaign, calling for more cooperation in Washington and largely keeping national Democrats, other than former Vice President Joseph R. Biden Jr., out of the district.

    Less than a decade removed from law school, Mr. Lamb, a Marine prosecutor turned assistant United States attorney, said he ran because he wanted to show his party he could compete in working-class white districts and help reconnect Democrats with organized labor.

    Mr. Saccone, a mild-mannered Air Force intelligence veteran, aggressively linked himself to Mr. Trump.

    “I was Trump before Trump was Trump,” he declared at the outset of the race, and on election eve, he went about proving he could deliver his own set of incendiary remarks.

    Standing next to Mr. Trump’s eldest son at a firehouse, Mr. Saccone said Democrats were energized by a hatred for the president, “a hatred for our country” and “a hatred for God.”

    Mr. Saccone echoed Mr. Trump’s call for steel tariffs, a popular position in what historically was a steel-and-coal anchored district. But Mr. Lamb also backed the president’s proposed 25 percent tax on imported steel, seeming to blunt an issue that Republicans sought to make central late in the campaign.

    Republicans hoped that stamping Mr. Trump’s brand on the race would help mobilize pro-Trump voters who are otherwise mostly tuned out of politics.

    But the president’s presence most likely cut both ways, energizing Democrats and disaffected moderates, as well as Mr. Trump’s base. In a rally with Mr. Saccone days before the election, Mr. Trump delivered a heated and unfocused speech, railing about illegal drugs, the Senate confirmation process and news coverage of his administration, and reminiscing about his own victories in 2016. He said relatively little about Mr. Saccone.

    Pennsylvania House Race, in a District Trump Won by 20 Points, Is Too Close to Call - The New York Times https://apple.news/ANwIYuoBxRHuEnekY_Vqi9g
     
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    Democrat Conor Lamb declares victory in Pa. special election

    CANONSBURG, PA -- Democrat Conor Lamb declared victory early Wednesday morning in his razor-tight bid for a Pittsburgh-area House special election, although the race hasn't yet been called.

    The seat, which voted for President Trump in 2016 by a 20-point margin, was once considered an easy win for Republicans. But Lamb currently leads Republican state Rep. Rick Saccone by 579 ballots, with some absentee ballots outstanding.

    "It took a little longer than we thought, but we did it. You did it," Lamb told supporters at his election night party shortly before 1 a.m., after he was introduced as "congressman-elect."

    "We followed what I learned in the Marines -- leave no one behind. We went everywhere, we talked to everyone, we invited everyone in."

    Lamb's campaign apparently believes that Republican Rick Saccone does not have a path to victory in those remaining ballots, leading to the decision to claim victory.

    Saccone promised earlier in the night to press, with his campaign telling MSNBC shortly after Lamb's remarks that they will not concede at this point. Media outlets have also not yet called the race.

    As of 1 a.m.Wednesday morning, Lamb leads by 579 votes, with a few thousand absentee ballots left to count, largely from GOP-leaning areas.

    The razor-thin margin is yet another shocking moment in this special election, which had initially been seen as a GOP cakewalk but that has trended in the Democratic direction in recent weeks.

    Republicans sunk more than $10 million into the district to boost Saccone, sending top surrogates like Trump to the district. But Lamb walked a fine line in the conservative district, bucking the national party on some key issues and rallying labor to his side.

    Lamb devoted a significant portion of his victory speech to thanking union members, a group that had been seen as key to Lamb's campaign.

    "Side by side with us at each step of the way were the men and women in organized labor," he said.

    "Organized labor built Western Pennsylvania...Tonight, they have reasserted their right to have a major part in our future."

    And while he did not mention Trump's name, he made it clear he would seek cooperation with the president, who remains more popular in this district than national averages suggest.

    "I'll work on the problems our people face, secure their jobs and pensions, protect their families. And I will work with anyone to do that," he said.

    Democrat Conor Lamb declares victory in Pa. special election - The Hill https://apple.news/AI0VzgQMBRZShuIDa-qcp-g
     
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    Democrat Conor Lamb apparent winner in Pennsylvania upset, deals blow to Trump

    WASHINGTON — Democrat Conor Lamb is the apparent winner over Republican Rick Saccone in Tuesday's special election in Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District, according to an NBC News projection.

    Lamb, who declared victory early Wednesday morning, was leading by 641 votes in a district long held by the GOP that President Donald Trump, who backed Saccone, carried by 20 points in 2016. Saccone has not conceded and his campaign is in touch with legal counsel.

    Shortly before 1:00 a.m., Lamb was introduced as "congressman-elect" at his election night party.

    "It took a little longer than we thought, but we did it!" Lamb told cheering supporters.

    Lamb, 33, was already looking ahead to Capitol Hill, saying, "Our job in Congress is to attack the problems, not each other."

    Earlier, Saccone, 60, addressed his supporters and stopped short of any declarations.

    "We're not giving up," Saccone said at about 11:30 p.m. "We're going to be working late into the night, tomorrow...Don't give up! We're going to win it!"

    Under state law, supporters of either candidate can request a recount if they believe there was an error in the initial tally. There is no provision, however, for automatic recounts in tight congressional elections.

    Bob Branstetter, general consultant for the Saccone campaign, told NBC News that the campaign has been in touch with legal counsel and is exploring all its options.

    The little-known third party Libertarian candidate had over 1,300 votes, more than the margin separating the two major candidates.

    The race is being closely watched as a pulse check on the political health of President Donald Trump ahead of November's crucial midterm elections.

    But the contest was never supposed to be competitive. In fact, there are 114 Republican-held House seats more competitive than Pennsylvania's 18th, according to a Democratic tabulation of the Cook Political Report's partisan voting index.

    The race flew under the radar for months because no one — most of all Democrats — thought they had a chance. The western Pennsylvania district is in the heart of "Trump country," as the president himself dubbed it Saturday during a campaign appearance for Saccone, and it voted overwhelmingly Republican in the past three presidential elections.

    The district was gerrymandered to guarantee easy reelections to its former occupant, Tim Murphy, a Republican, who was forced to resign last year after it was revealed that the pro-life lawmaker had pressured his mistress to have an abortion.

    But Lamb, propelled by the national anti-Trump tailwind, has steadily gained in recent polls.

    Republicans sounded the alarm as early as January and began dumping millions of dollars into the race to boost Saccone.

    With two visits to the district, Trump led a parade of high-profile surrogates for Saccone, underscoring both how invested the White House and GOP leaders felt in the race, and how nervous they were about its outcome.

    National Democrats, on the other hand, kept their distance. Determined not to repeat the fiasco of last year's special election in Georgia, when their multi-million-dollar intervention ended up tainting the party's candidate in the eyes of conservative voters, they gave Lamb room to define himself.

    Drawing on his background as a Marine and former federal prosecutor, Lamb disowned Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and staked out positions on abortion, guns and fracking that hewed closer to the GOP.

    But Lamb also embraced the classics of the Democratic playbook, hammering Saccone for allegedly wanting to cut Social Security and Medicare, and uniting Pittsburgh's powerful unions behind him in a way no Democrat had before in that district.

    While the district will soon no longer exist, thanks to a recent ruling by the Pennsylvania Supreme Court, and one House seat is not worth much in 2018 Washington, the race was nonetheless freighted with real consequences for both parties as they gear up for a crucial midterm election.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/politics/el...cial-election-conor-lamb-rick-saccone-n856411
     
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    GOP Hill leaders warn incumbents: Pennsylvania loss a 'wake-up call'

    WASHINGTON — There were competing Republican reactions Wednesday to the apparent victory of Democrat Conor Lamb in Pennsylvania’s 18th Congressional District hours earlier.

    Publicly, many — though not all — dismissed the result as an outlier with just a few useful takeaways for GOP candidates looking to dodge a Democratic wave. Privately, just as many feared that Tuesday night's result may have signaled that there are no surefire strategies, and no district is secure.

    "If you're a Republican in a safe seat," said retiring Rep. Charlie Dent, R-Pa., "you better be ready."

    House Speaker Paul Ryan, R-Wis., dismissed Lamb's apparent win as a victory for the GOP message.

    "I think the candidate that’s going to win this race is the candidate that ran as a pro-life, pro-gun, anti-Nancy Pelosi conservative," he said at a news conference Wednesday. "That’s the candidate that’s going to win this race."

    Behind closed doors, Ryan cautioned Republicans that the race was "a bit of a wake-up call,” Rep. Kevin Cramer of North Dakota told reporters after the session.

    “I think you can’t deny that, and if you do, you’re lying. And he doesn’t lie," Cramer said of Ryan.

    House GOP leaders warned their members at Wednesday's meeting that one big lesson of the race was the need to significantly step up their fundraising. “We need to make sure that our candidates aren’t massively outraised and outspent on TV as it was the case between these two candidates,” Ryan said at a later news conference.

    More money never hurts — but, as many Democrats noted Wednesday, it wasn't the issue in the Saccone-Lamb race, where Republican and conservative outside groups spent more than $10 million on the campaign, more than twice what opposing groups invested in the race.

    In the wake of Saccone's apparent defeat, Ryan also stressed the need for members of his conference to run on the tax plan that passed late last year — a message that Saccone and outside groups supporting his candidacy had embraced throughout the campaign, though their focus switched in the home stretch to culture war touchstones.

    The overall GOP message Wednesday sounded much like the explanation party leaders offered following the surprise victory of Democrat Doug Jones in Alabama's Senate race last year: that few big lessons could be drawn from the loss because the Democrat had run against a flawed candidate and embraced enough of the Republican platform that he was practically a member of the party.

    “I think Mr. Lamb was brilliant," said Rep. Mike Kelly, R-Pa. "He ran as a Republican. It worked for him. He certainly didn’t run as a Democrat."

    Lamb did support Trump’s tariffs plan and is personally anti-abortion. He is also strongly pro-labor, criticized Republicans for their efforts to repeal Obamacare and has called for expanded background checks for firearm purchases.

    And the analysis that his apparent win was due to his success in making his positions palatable to a traditionally conservative electorate may have been cold comfort to the 118 Republicans running in districts more Democratic than his.

    "I'm sure there's going to be a narrative that Democrats had the right candidate and we didn't have our preferred candidate," said Dent, who leaves Congress at the end of the year after serving in the House since 2005.

    "Truth is, this is a very toxic environment and this is a district that is 95 percent white. Trump won by 20 points. I don't think we should look at these districts necessarily as Trump winning by 20 — you can consider it as a minus 20 Hillary district, too."

    Perhaps the biggest morning-after question mark hovering over the Hill Wednesday: If President Donald Trump couldn't deliver victory in an area that gave him a double-digit win in 2016, how could he help save his party's House majority?

    Whether or not the president actively visits a district, said Dent, he'll be a presence in the race.

    “This midterm is going to be a referendum on the party in power, and the president of the United States in particular, and his conduct in office,” he said.

    As of Wednesday afternoon, Trump had not reacted publicly to Lamb’s victory. He had stumped for Saccone in Pennsylvania, even holding a rally just days before the election on Saturday night near Pittsburgh. The president’s son, Donald Trump Jr., also campaigned for Saccone a day before the election.

    Sen. Jeff Flake, R-Ariz., a fierce critic of the president who’s also planning to retire from Congress this year, was asked Wednesday if Republicans should be more worried after losing a district that Trump won.

    “Yeah,” he said, laughing. “Goes without saying.”

    GOP Hill leaders warn incumbents: Pennsylvania loss a 'wake-up call' - NBC News https://apple.news/ANjEnqufITs6BB0XrJjl9pQ
     
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    So I guess the Alabama special election for Senate in December wasn’t a wake-up call? The one where Democrat Doug Jones handed Republican Roy Moore’s @$$ to him in a state that’s about as deep red as it gets? The one where both Trump and that ghoul Steve Bannon endorsed the pervert and he lost anyway (despite the fact that Trump won Alabama in 2016 by more than 27 percentage points)?

    Not to mention the 4 House special elections in previously safe red districts in which the Democrats made massive gains: Kansas (net Democratic gain from previous election = 24.9 percentage points), Montana (net gain = 10.0), South Carolina (net gain = 17.4), and Georgia (net gain = 19.8).

    Must be fake news.
     

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