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Unforgotten - Series 3

Discussion in 'TV Central' started by Barbara Fan, Jul 16, 2018.

  1. Barbara Fan

    Barbara Fan Super Moderator Staff Member

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    New series started last night and it has to be one of my fav shows on TV, I love the casting and the plots and Nicola Walker and Sanjeev Baskhar are great

    Great supporting cast again as in S1-2 and nice to see mad Maya from Corrie again

    https://www.express.co.uk/showbiz/t...y-Reid-Sister-Cassie-Stuart-Sunny-ITV-twitter

    UNFORGOTTEN returned to ITV last night with a hard-hitting episode that laid down the surface for several upcoming plot twists, but the closing scene left viewers in tears


    The first episode of the series saw the body of a teenage girl who went missing at the turn of the millennium found at a building site off the M1 motorway.

    Nicola Walker and Sanjeev Bhaskar reprised their roles as DCI Cassie Stuart and DI Sunil ‘Sunny’ Khan to investigate the emotionally-charged cold case.

    The body was eventually identified as Hayley Reid, a 16-year-old who vanished on New Year’s Eve in 1999.

    The closing scene saw Hayley’s sister return a phone call to the detectives confirming her sister did indeed have a plate fitted to her broken wrist during a holiday in Cyprus.

    This connected Hayley to the remains found by the police, with the team immediately sent to the mother’s house to continue the process and gather further details.

    After hanging up the phone, Hayley’s sister broke down after years of agonisingly waiting for news.

    Viewers instantly took to social media following the emotional episode ending.

    One fan of the show tweeted: “My heart has been wrenched already. This is going to be a powerful series #unforgotten.”

    “#Unforgotten Heartbreaking ending which really made you feel the poor poor family's pain…”

    A third wrote: “That must be heartbreaking having to question those families. Having potentially raised their hopes of closure, to just snatch it away on the outcome of one question. #Unforgotten.”
    I can’t imagine the feeling you’d have if you were the one getting that phone call out of the blue after years of pain and anguish. #Unforgotten,” wrote another.

    Noting how Hayley’s mother had not got out of bed by the late afternoon, one tweeted: “Heartbroken to see what Hayley's disappearance has done to her mother. #Unforgotten.”

    “#Unforgotten tough job making all those phone calls to bereaved relatives!” noted another.

    A third added: “This is really intense. I am hoping that the parents who haven't received closure will get it soon. #Unforgotten.”

    Alex Jennings, Kevin R McNally, Neil Morrissey and James Fleet played a close-knit group of old school friends.
    The four men were lightly explored in tonight’s episode, but each will be placed under the spotlight and their relationships tested to the limit.

    One fan tweeted: “Gonna be interesting to see how all these stories come together and what the link between them all is. #Unforgotten.”

    “#Unforgotten has got me absolutely hooked already can't wait for next weeks episode,” posted another.

    Unforgotten continues next Sunday on ITV at 9pm.
     
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  2. Barbara Fan

    Barbara Fan Super Moderator Staff Member

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    https://thekillingtimestv.wordpress.com/2018/07/15/review-unforgotten-s3-e1-6/

    Welcome back, DCI Cassie Stuart and DI Sunny Khan – the most human cops on the box - you’ve been away too long. Let’s hope that three’s the charm.

    BAFTA nominee Nicola Walker (last seen transcending rather trite material in The Split) and Sanjeev Bhaskar (here, there and everywhere – and occasionally gracing the recent series of Horrible Histories) reprise their roles as DCI Cassie Stuart and DI Sunil ‘Sunny’ Khan, based in Bishop Street in London as they investigate another emotionally-charged cold case.

    Creator and writer Chris Lang likes the slow-burn approach, and here the setup remains as before – a group of suspects connected by a collective past, giving Lang scope for offering a historical snapshot as background. Last time it was the excesses of Thatcherite Britain, this time it’s the millennium.

    The notable bunch of acclaimed supporting actors includes Alex Jennings (A Very English Scandal, The Crown) Kevin R McNally (Pirates Of The Caribbean, Designated Survivor), Neil Morrissey (who sensationally added to the gravitas of Line Of Duty, The Good Karma Hospital) and James Fleet (Indian Summers, The Vicar Of Dibley).

    Cassie’s not sleeping, worried about her dotty father and absent son; Sunny, who normally looks like someone’s shot his dog, is relatively happy as he’s pursuing a new girlfriend, though still struggling with custody of his teenage daughters.

    But the police business revolves around the discovery of human remains buried under the central reservation of the M1 at Hendon. A titanium plate made in Cyprus helps the cops establish that the victim is not an archaeological curiosity, but Hayley Reid, a 16-year-old who went missing in 2000.

    The cops seem to spend an inordinate amount of time talking to doctors and phoning families to identify the victim when clearly the information about distinguishing features would have all been in their missing person files all the time.

    So to the suspects, an ill-assorted bunch whose connection is, as usual, initially unclear – mind you, they’re all white males in their early 60s, so maybe they were college mates, and we know from several phone calls that they’re arranging to meet up.

    In Hampshire, GP Dr Tim Finch (Alex Jennings) is concerned about allegations of impropriety by an Alison Pinion (Gabrielle Glaister, forever remembered as ‘Bob’ in Blackadder). In Bristol, artist Chris Lowe (James Fleet) – presumably no relation to the Pet Shop Boy – is conducting a relationship with single mother Jamila. In North Norfolk, Alan Partridge country, salesman Pete Carr (Neil Morrissey) is struggling with his marriage while conning pensioners out of their savings, while in London, perpetually angry quiz show host James Hollis (Kevin McNally) is worrying about his druggie son and arguing with his ex-wife Mel (Sara Stewart).

    At the time of Hayley’s widely publicised disappearance, on the way to a New Year’s Eve party, she was wearing a Madonna fancy dress outfit – so what became of that? At the time, boyfriend Adrian Mullery was a suspect – so is he still on the scene? – certainly there’s no sign of him this week.

    As for the other suspects-to-be, they are currently unaware that their pasts are about to be trawled through – they all have trouble enough in the present. But that is the MO of Unforgotten – our sympathies are toyed with, and we don’t know which characters will turn out to be virtuous, and which vicious.

    Unlike virtually any other police procedural, Unforgotten lacks any element of police wise-cracking over corpses, bantering with the pathologist, or brow-beating suspects. Contrast this with the histrionics of the Poundshop Saga Noren, Marcella, or shouty cop Viv Deering in No Offence.

    In Unforgotten, the cops treat everyone as a human being – in fact, they’re so sympathetic that you expect them to burst into tears and bring out the hankies at every interview. Surely they’d be a bit more hardened than this? Admittedly, the traumatic effect of an unresolved case is greatest on the relatives of the victim, and here we see the emotional repercussions of the investigation on Hayley’s sister Jessica (Bronagh Waugh) and her mother.

    Obviously, at this stage any speculation about perpetrator, motive or circumstances is far too early – but James Fleet is terribly good at confession scenes. We’ll say no more for now.

    Deborah Shrewsbury
    @Shrewdkitty
     
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  3. Barbara Fan

    Barbara Fan Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Who was it who partied like it was 1999 on the night of teenager Hayley Reid’s murder?

    Having identified the remains found under the motorway, and established that the cause of death was strangulation, our intrepid tecs now have to settle on some suspects.

    Journalist-turned-TV-quizmaster James Hollis (Kevin McNally), who has an ego the size of Jeremy Paxman’s, is infuriated that his ex-wife hadn’t tipped him the wink about his conflicted gender-fluid son Elliot (Tom Rhys Harries). He sneers at her for not getting ‘over him’ since their divorce 17 years previously. A bit rich, since she’s played by gorgeous Sara Stewart. Their son is ‘experimenting with his identity’, which seems to mean slapping on a layer of Boots Number 7 and a trenchcoat.

    Poor old artist Chris Lowe (James Fleet)in Bristol is having a tough time; just as he’s getting his lady friend Jamila to consider marriage, his mobile home is turned over and their flat deposit is gone – as is his dog – what has he done to deserve this? Did they see him coming? Just when he thought he was home and dry? It’s a sin. OK, that’s enough Pet Shop Boys jokes.

    Chris’ descent into mental illness from a promising career as a gifted artist now looks set to go from gentle slide to plummet. Poor guy – even his mobile ringtone is melancholy. On the bright side he could get quite a bit for his classic WV campervan – even with a broken window.

    He pours his heart out to old friend GP Dr Tim Finch (Alex Jennings), who’s in Manchester facing a General Medical Council hearing. Although he’s the calm one of the quartet as the professional among them, he also seems to be the one who stands to fall further than the others. He’s being interrogated about abusing an elderly woman with Pick’s disease – a particularly distressing form of dementia. (Comedian David Baddiel’s stage show ‘My Family: Not the Sitcom’ offers something of a masterclass in this condition).

    The fact that Finch is so attentive to Lowe’s problems – to the extent of getting a load of ‘lost dog’ notices printed, and subbing him until he sells his next masterpiece, appears indicative that there is a pact between them that goes beyond Finch’s Hippocratic oath (or its modern equivalent anyway). And what’s Lowe’s aversion to banks?

    Reflecting the world of pain, Cassie (Nicola Walker) and Sunny (Sanjeev Bhaskar) travel down to meet Hayley’s parents – or rather the shells that are left of them, says Hayley’s identical twin sister Jessica (Bronagh Waugh). She warns the cops that they won’t be welcomed by the pitchfork-wielding, unfriendly locals of picture-postcard Middenham, which lost its tourist USP because of Hayley’s murder, sparking wall-to-wall bankruptcies in the village because of the ensuing media circus.

    Cassie has problems with her plumbing (perhaps that’s why she looks so depressed) and her dad (Peter Egan) has a new GF whom he takes to Harvey Nicks. Cassie is almost playing the mother to her father’s recalcitrant child. She really needs a bloke. In fact, the partners both need good home lives if they don’t wish to burn out soon.

    Sunny’s personal life though seems to be on an upward trajectory with new squeeze Sal (Michelle Bonnard), who is helping him get down with the kids – or at least his own kids. “You knew who Stormy was,” he gushes over the phone – out by a Z, but he’s trying, bless him.

    Staying over at a hotel in the rural idyll of Middenham, Cassie and Sunny meet retired DCI John Bentley (Alistair Mackenzie), second-in-command on the original case. He blames his late boss for wasting time by following a theory that Hayley had run away from home to London. The investigation, he says, was flawed from the start. He tells them that Hayley’s boyfriend at the time, Adrian Mullery (Gerald Kyd), had been the prime suspect, but he although he was a few years older than the victim, he was an unlikely perpetrator and was never charged.

    Bentley points out that on Millennium Eve almost everyone had been in a very public place. After touring the village, Cassie sees holiday let cottages in an estate agent’s window and the cogs start turning; could Hayley have been murdered in the village by an outsider, and taken the 80-odd miles back to London for disposal on the M1 at Hendon?

    Having Cassie and Sunny sitting on a bed might seem provocative given his previous cack-handed romantic approaches – it was certainly difficult to concentrate on her line of reasoning for the murder, because of Sunny’s diverting green pyjama-top with the bear print – not a very effective aphrodisiac, but very Sunny.

    Once the news of the reopened investigation hits the streets, our suspects begin to go to pieces – Hollis blowing his lines during the sign-off to his show (writer Chris Lang makes a cameo appearance as the studio floor manager).

    The good doctor’s malpractice case starts to look a bit more hopeful for him when it transpires that his accuser Alison Pinion (Gabrielle Glaister) is a serial doc-botherer, and has tried to extort cash from four other GP practices by alleging malpractice.

    But Pete Carr (Neil Morrissey) is still in lumber; the daughter of his scammed pensioner wants to cancel his cash ISA within the cooling-off period. And just after he’d he’d cashed the cheque. And it’s been spent on a broken boiler already. And what does his wife Maria (Indra Ove) mean about his delayed adolescence in Hong Kong?

    At a fraught press conference, the journalists act like animals – why are journalists always portrayed in this lazy, contentious way, particularly post-Leveson when they would actually be on their best behaviour?

    Hayley’s best friend Kelly (Lauren Drummond, who looks a good ten years too young for the role), who worked with her at a cleaning company, comes forward to admit that Hayley filled in for her on a cleaning job at a holiday let, The Spinney, while Kelly met a boy – she’s kept quiet all these years, but now realises these facts may be vital.

    DS Murray Boulting (Jordan Long) finds out that Paxman – sorry, Hollis – was the person who rented the holiday home, with the others on the form being Carr, Finch, Lowe plus their families.

    But how could this involve Hayley’s then-boyfriend Mullery, now working in a London girls’ school? And how is news blogger Sandra Rayworth (Tori Allen Martin) involved, and why does she blame the parents?

    Hollis, (‘the thinking woman’s muffin’ according to Cassie’s late mum, as opposed to Joan Bakewell’s description by Frank Muir as the ‘thinking man’s crumpet’) makes Cassie go all fan-girly on his doorstep, but he lawyers up instantly, perhaps not the actions of an entirely innocent man. But then he probably has much to hide apart from the 17-year-old murder. “It’s happened sweetheart – they’ve come – the police – about her”, he says to his son Elliot. Does this imply some degree of guilt?

    Though the full facts have not entirely been established, we can assume from what we have been given that the investigation will reveal stories of drunkenness, bad behaviour and sexual indiscretions at the Millennium celebrations. But which of the four suspects – or, let’s be even-handed, their families – will turn out to have the least plausible alibi?

    Deborah Shrewsbury
    @shrewdkitty
     
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  4. Barbara Fan

    Barbara Fan Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I really didnt recognise Gabrielle Glaister in it from Blackadder "Bob" and Corrie, she doesnt look as if she had aged too well

    Mad Maya from Corrie on the other hand hasnt changed that much and really loving this show, its probably my fav show on TV now

    Roll on Ep 3
     
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  5. Banana Hammock

    Banana Hammock Soap Chat Well-Known Member

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    Is it Cassie's Dad that's having trouble with his memory, or is it Cassie herself ?
     
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  6. Barbara Fan

    Barbara Fan Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Im not sure, I think she is having an issue with her dad spending his money on a younger woman and wanting to move in with her

    Sure most of us have forgotten that the cooker is on at some point!! lol

    I have no idea who done it and how it will all fit together

    Great writing and acting all round

    Poor Neil Morissey!!
     
  7. Barbara Fan

    Barbara Fan Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Great drama and cant believe the last episode was last night

    I cried at the end! And I wasnt sure who done it until the final episode

    More please ITV, its one of the best!
     
  8. Barbara Fan

    Barbara Fan Super Moderator Staff Member

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    There must be a reason why Unforgotten creator/writer Chris Lang has, throughout the three series, envisioned four chief suspects and it may be as simple as maths; counting and calculation.

    A triumvirate, you see, has spiritual strength. Three is the first odd prime number, which gives it the power of indivisibility (God, the Son and the Holy Spirit – see, indivisible). The Greeks and Romans had the three graces. The Vikings were big on trios too. Triangles are considered the most robust shape because a triangular structure under force only collapses because of material fatigue and not because of geometric distortion. So, stronger when compared with a square. And barring The Beatles has there ever been a magic four?

    The quartet of friends in series two observed the code of omertà and so got away with murder, but they had led fairly blameless lives hitherto and since, so had nothing to gain from fragmenting.

    Our ‘four amigos’ (that even sounds wrong) form the four points of a recreated past and all have seen sharp vicissitudes of fortune. And boy, their pasts are coming back fast to tear them asunder.

    Especially our impecunious artist Chris Lowe (James Fleet), who apart from his bipolar disorder could also suffer from PTSD because he seems to be the most affected by the gruesome pursuit flashbacks he is having to Millennium Eve.

    His estranged daughter Maya (Leah West) tells Cassie (Nicola Walker) and Sunny (Sanjeev Bhaskar) that her father stood down from his advertising company and was chucked out of the family home because he’d been arrested by police for downloading kiddie porn in the ‘Landmark’ case – presumably a Yewtree-style investigation – into child abuse.

    Our Primark Wolf of Wall Street, Pete Carr (Neil Morrissey) is also staving off bad memories; being shown Hayley’s photo is taking him back to a boozy night, what looks like a cashpoint screen and glimpses of a distressed Chinese girl. And we’d have laid money on the fact that, always having been a ducker and diver, Carr would be the one who nicked the silverware in the church break-in that same night – it’s his blood that was found in there – and in Hong Kong he’d served jail time for defrauding a disabled charity into bankruptcy. He blames “some cash-flow issues’ when quizzed by Sunny and Cassie. Wife Maria gets more horrified by the second when she forces him to confess – then decides she’s had more than an elegant sufficiency of the marriage.

    But when it comes to marital duplicity James Hollis (Kevin McNally) is a master. Our malign blogger Sandra Rayworth, (Tori Allen-Martin) is now gunning for him on her From the Hip website. He wants to sue but although he has deep enough pockets to engage a lawyer, she doesn’t have the proverbial pot in which to micturate – living in a council flat. Again the press are door-stepping him. Really? Would any national paper dare do this to this extent now – especially since the ill-judged BBC-Sir Cliff fiasco? He gets suspended from his TV show and to compound his misery ex-wife Mel (Sara Stewart) is interviewed on the radio about her new novel, a thinly veiled portrait of her marriage to a serial adulterer – and his colourful sexual proclivities. “Does liking a shag in the woods make me a murderer?” he asks his poor current wife Amy (Emma Fielding).

    The icing on the cake is evidence emerging that Hollis had a black car with a tow bar and trailer – possibly the vehicle that was seen driving erratically through Middenham on the night of the murder. Nodding out in the bosom of his crack den, Eliot (Tom Rhys Harris) reads the gossip on his mobile.

    Dr Tim Finch (Alex Jennings), probably fearing that Lowe is the weakest link and likely to go rogue, tries to placate him with a heart-to-heart after his encounter with Cassie (she’s a sweetheart; he’ll come across much tougher interrogators later no doubt). Dr Smooth then tells his current wife and daughters about it –saying disingenuously that the investigation is Middenham-wide.

    Finch has more woes once unstable ex-wife Derran (Siobhan Redmond) tells DC Jake Collier (Lewis Reeves) that she was unsurprised the story has surfaced and that she’d always thought he’d been involved in Hayley’s fate. She gives us a glimpse of him behind closed doors for 13 years – physically, mentally and sexually abusing her. She asks Finch for £50,000, threatening to blackmail him with photographs showing how he used her like a punch-bag. He calls her bluff and walks out – so she goes to police. They aren’t totally convinced, though.

    So where would Carr go once Maria throws him out penniless? To his old mucker Hollis, who says he has enough troubles of his own. The carefully nurtured old pals act starts to unravel at speed, with Carr threatening that he ‘knows stuff” about what Eliot did that night.

    Police have had a whip-round to buy Hayley’s coffin (what little of her there is to bury), a kind thought, but cold comfort to her twin sister Jessica (Bronagh Waugh).

    Sunny manages to wheedle a schoolgirl grin out of Cassie, who admits that dashing ex-cop John Bentley has asked her out to dinner. But she’s soon deflated when Martin (Peter Egan) counters her suggestion that he’s going senile and his new girlfriend is a gold-digger and he practically calls his daughter a lonely middle-aged woman. The next day, tired and shaken, she makes the devastating mistake of leaving Carr’s case files in a café – “I’m losing the plot”, she tells Sunny. Now she’s in hot water with her boss Det Supt Andrews (Colin R Campbell). Should a police office really be taking crime files to lunch? There is a little thing called the General Data Protection Regulation now, you know.

    Cassie makes a mea culpa message on the TV news – but it’s way too late for Carr – who has now told Finch about Eliot.

    Her trickle of troubles then turns into a Niagara Falls as the kind person who found them tips off Rayworth, and Carr’s notes go viral. We enjoyed one of her social media respondents’ handles – #YouCan’tHandletheTruth.

    En route home, Carr is told by boss Mark (Finlay Robertson) that his desk is being cleared – and he can Google himself to find out why.

    There had to come a palm-sweating, throat-drying point where the diligent workaholic DCI Cassie Stuart (Nicola Walker) made a grievous error. Thus far our doughty heroes have rarely put a foot wrong. But when the gods conspire against you a simple mistake can spark a cataclysmic chain of events.

    Cassie, exhausted, stressed over her father’s diminishing capacity while handling probably the most high-profile murder case during her time in the force, risks blowing her credibility under the media spotlight and destroying her career. Not only that – has her slip cost someone’s life? Which one of Carr’s erstwhile friends sent the angel of death? That was probably his last question.

    Lang is a master at drawing those strands together, but with only a few episodes left it looks as if there’s everything still to play for.

    Deborah Shrewsbury
    @shrewdkitty
     
  9. Barbara Fan

    Barbara Fan Super Moderator Staff Member

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    By this stage, though the field of suspects is narrowing, the case is throwing up anomalies and making it harder for the protagonists to find the catharsis they seek.

    As we suspected, attention is turning to James Hollis’s errant son Eliot, a troubled youth, and not the little boy he was portrayed as. But Hollis is also falling under suspicion as it becomes clear that he has tried to manipulate the others in the group.

    Most disturbingly, though, Pete Carr has been stabbed, apparently by a random nutter, putting the dampers on Cassie’s romantic evening with former cop John Bentley (Alastair Mackenzie).

    Bentley has revealed that he was ‘A19’d’ (Regulation A19, which required police officers with more than 30 years’ pensionable service to retire owing to police cutbacks (thanks, David Cameron and your austerity measures).

    Cassie intimates that she’s considering making a cutback of one – having put in 28 years, after her massive screw-up with the lost Carr files, she’s considering throwing in the towel (why is she still on the case, though? – it’s totally implausible). While he tries to talk her out of out it, arguing how she has the privilege of being able to help people often at the very worst moments of their lives, we can’t help indeed still wondering whether he could have been cashiered at such an early age. Anyway, he’s brought a rare smile to Cassie’s face, and she has little else to be happy about.

    As they swap favourite crime movies (Naked Gun, Midnight Run, Fargo – how about those for a busman’s holiday?), Pete Carr’s (Neil Morrissey) lifeblood is dribbling out on the shoreline of Norfolk.

    However, we are but the playthings of Unforgotten creator Chris Lang, who toys with our expectations of the morality tale. It seems at first Carr is not yet out of the reckoning. The police are told he was stabbed by a local far-right nut-job who’s been incited by online speculation about paedophile connections in the murder of Hayley Reid. Whatever, it’s brought tearful wife Maria (Indra Ové) back on side, so, swings and roundabouts…

    Eliot remains a suspect – he was picked up for drug offences and TWOC-ing his dad’s car – and smooth operator Tim Finch (Alex Jennings) deftly contributes Carr’s story about seeing Eliot sneak back into the window of the holiday cottage in the early hours of New Year’s Day – with a snakelike covert glance to see its impact on Cassie and Sunny.

    But DC Fran Lingley (Caroline Main) has been doing a bit of code-breaking on Hayley’s teenage sex and drugs diary, and surmises that on the night of her death she’d left work at the pub early to meet her dealer, ‘G’.

    Chris Lowe (James Fleet) admits that Hayley’s murder was always on his mind (we shouldn’t still be making Pet Shop Boys jokes at this stage), as he was in a manic bipolar phase, hopped up on coke, and profoundly traumatised by being charged with visiting child sex abuse websites – a charge he denies, and of which he was later cleared, too late to save his career and marriage. Fleet is so good in this role – jittery, constantly moving, unable to make full eye contact with his antagonists – and just generally heart-breaking.

    Cassie and Sunny look as though they are being pummelled by his every utterance – and Cassie cracks when news comes through from the hospital that Carr has died of a heart attack. Her phone message to Maria is excruciating – made worse by the pitying faces of her subordinates as she does her walk of shame through the office. Is this the lowest we’ve ever seen Cassie – a DCI, crying on the loo? Certainly it’s the first time we’ve ever seen her racked by guilt for her own mistake.

    To compound her misery – and the force’s ignominy – the press pack has turned its glare on her. The behaviour of the red-tops is one thing, but would ITV News really offer such outrageously emotive editorialising of the story? No, this is just jarringly OTT in such an otherwise well-crafted script. This doesn’t shake the Reid family’s trust in Cassie, and implausibly, her DS allows her to keep the case for now, pending a hearing by the independent police complaints commission.

    Even Cassie’s dad Martin (Peter Egan) is forsaking her – all packed up to take off with his guileful lady-love to give Cassie “some space” as practice for when he marries the money-grubber.

    As one moves out, another tries to move back in: Sunny’s wife Usha (Shobna Gulati) digs in the emotional blackmail knife by suggesting it would be in the kids’ interests for her to come home. Sunny reckons he’s moved on – good for him.

    On the plus side, Sandra Rayworth (Tori Allen-Martin), our malicious blogger, is arrested. She claims that, as a journalism graduate, she just “wanted to get a job”. Let that sink in; a journalism graduate with no knowledge of libel law and incitement to violence. Throw the book at her, judge.

    Hollis tracks down Eliot (Tom Rhys Harries) in his crack den, confronting him about the events of the night. Boy, do one’s parents muck you up (as Philip Larkin almost said). Hollis, fearing his drunken son had knocked Hayley down then buried the body, realises that he has blighted both their lives by lying during the original investigation.

    It dawns on Finch’s eldest daughter Emma (Jo Herbert) that her doctor dad is a Jekyll-and-Hyde character when she takes a trip to see her long-absent mother Derran (Siobhan Redmond) to get her side of the domestic abuse story.

    ‘G’ the drug dealer, Nigel Farndell (Fergus O’Donnell), obviously doesn’t get high on his own supply, as it turns out he remembers selling to Hayley on the night of her death, and even where she was headed after – corroborating the alibis of both Carr and the Hollises, but not eliminating Chris Lowe or Tim Finch.

    So did Finch have Hayley’s dead body in his car boot when he got a speeding endorsement on January 3 on the A405 at 6.20am to London a day after having already returned home from Middenham? It’s definitely a tickle, observes Sunny.

    Finch’s explanation that he had returned to Middenham for his laptop doesn’t hold up – he’s arrested, and a search of his home turns up a silver necklace, a scrunchie with attached hairs, and a pair of knickers. Seems pretty damning, but DNA evidence will surely tell a more revealing tale.

    Meanwhile, as unpleasant and manipulative as Finch might be, what of the other suspects? We haven’t seen the former boyfriend since his first questioning – is he truly out of the picture?

    And what are we to make of the fact that the murdered girl was an identical twin? Surely this can’t be a case of the dreaded identity mix-up? That would be rather gimmicky by the normally high standards of Unforgotten. Is the victim’s sister Jessica suppressing knowledge either consciously or unconsciously? And do the four women in the holiday cottage know more than they have revealed?

    Cassie and Sunny have some heavy-duty muckraking left to complete in next week’s finale – then maybe Cassie can get a good night’s sleep and make out with that nice John Bentley.

    Deborah Shrewsbury
    @shrewdkitty
     
  10. Barbara Fan

    Barbara Fan Super Moderator Staff Member

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    The death of suspect Peter Carr on her watch was a punch to the solar plexus Cassie (Nicola Walker) was not ready for. As her guilt drags her down, sidekick Sunny (Sanjeev Bhaskar) has regained his customary haunted, confused demeanour as he watches his beloved colleague’s spirits circle the mental drain.

    Since the police raid on his knicker drawers at the end of the last episode turned up some worrying material for the path lab, we’ve become more circumspect about the true bedside manner of Dr Tim Finch (Alex Jennings). He seems the most intractable liar of the lot (ladies, have you ever tied up your hair with your panties? Thought not); he’s certainly had a lot of practice at deception and his attitudes to women leave much to be desired.

    However, this series has really led both the audience and the police up the garden path; as creator and writer Chris Lang said this past week after surveying the flurry of theories on Twitter: “No one is anywhere near it at all.”

    Dead Hayley Reid’s mum (Brid Brennan) seems more distraught for daughter Jessica (Bronagh Waugh) as they make their way to London to see Cassie, although she’s together enough to assure the police that the items found at the Finch home were not Hayley’s.

    However, they did belong to another teenage girl, Allison Baldwin, who had been raped and strangled in 1997- three years eariler than Hayley – in woods in Cambridgeshire. Cassie decides to do a sweep of similar murders in Finch’s locale and sets about detailing the task to the squad while visibly falling apart emotionally – trusty Sunny jumps in to cut short her humiliation.

    The pressure is getting to her as her own kids aren’t calling her. When John Bentley leaves her a text to ask if she needs help, she deletes him from her contacts; probably just as well for the moment, Cassie doesn’t need the complications.

    The teamwork that follows pays off in that a spare wheel from Finch’s old Audi is found buried behind the holiday cottage in Middenham and a surgery diary entry is discovered that places him in a hotel near where Allison’s body was found.

    Under interrogation, those snake eyes flashing, Finch admits he killed the girls and offers to tell Cassie and Sunny what happened to “the other girls”, how they died and where they are buried – as long as they “can avoid turning it into some sort of sordid circus”.

    Relations between James Hollis (Kevin McNally) and his son Elliot (Tom Rhys Harries) might be forever torn, but there is something of a rapprochement between Hollis and ex-wife Mel (Sara Stewart); she says Elliot has to own his mistakes, and she urges him to mend his lothario ways and win back his current wife, Amy, whom she describes as “a good’un”.

    Alone among our suspects Chris Lowe (James Fleet) now seems to be, er, home and dry (sorry that’s the last of our Pet Shop Boys silliness). He has been a blameless victim – is he now free to make a new life with Jamilla (Sasha Behar) and her young son? Rather depends on why she has nipped up to London to talk to the police on the Landmark paedophilia case.

    Finch emerges as a true sociopath – he describes himself a ‘textbook psychopath’ in forensic detail (probably the first we have been presented with in any of these series) as he shows no remorse for the killings he says he’s committed. He admits to Cassie that pretence of friendships and feelings for patients has been ‘second nature’ to him all his life. Hayley was, he says nonchalantly, in the “wrong time, wrong place” and the opportunity “seemed too good to miss”. All his answers come with a half-smile to wind up his interrogators. Cassie is displaying such torment that we wouldn’t have been surprised if she’d jabbed her pen in his eye. As Sunny says afterwards, it’s the closest thing to evil they’ve ever witnessed.

    Hollis and Lowe, the remains of our four amigos, sit wordlessly opposite each other in a pub following the TV news of the charges against Finch. Their lives shattered, they must now pick up the pieces, a process they seem to have begun by the time of Carr’s funeral as Jamilla is expecting a baby.

    While the home front looks empty and bleak for Cassie, at Sunny’s place things are definitely looking more hopeful. His daughters give his new relationship their blessing because as much as they love their mother, they prefer to see Dad happy. It’s cuddles all round in the Khan household while Cassie surveys her empty kitchen.

    It always bodes ill when a suspect is taken under guard to the scene of the crime; this is a gruesome procedure for Cassie, who snaps and runs away when the remains of a third body are found. “No more”, she murmurs. After stalking around aimlessly in the rain before going home, she finds Martin (Peter Egan) in an emollient mood and decides to heed his advice to take time off.

    Three months later, awaiting trial on remand, Finch does his best Hannibal Lecter when Sunny and DC Fran Lingley (Caroline Main) visit. He’s angling for more books in prison and Sunny tells him that he needs more information first – quid pro quo. Finch needles Sunny about Cassie’s departure. “Spare us the ‘Silence of The Lambs’ schtick next time” adds Sunny. It isn’t a nice Chianti that Finch then offers, but information about the location of another victim. We suspect that there will be many more. As a GP, he has been hiding in plain sight for many years. Oh, well, Harold Shipman was a family doctor too.

    As Jessica and her mother find a bright spot for Hayley’s burial, they are joined by Sunny and Cassie (who seems to have rekindled her fledgling relationship with Bentley – good, perhaps he’ll persuade her not to put her papers in quite yet).

    Having dissected how the lies and misconceptions of the past resonate with our present in series one, and the concept of natural justice in the second, in series 3 Lang addresses the effects of social media on the febrile psychological state of our nation post-Jo Cox and the Brexit vote, in which a few well-aimed malicious postings can foment hatred and violence.

    He’s also brought his lead characters face to face with the heart of darkness; the first ‘real’ murderer we have seen them deal with rather than the unfortunate killers we’ve met in the previous two series. But he’s avoided the sensationalist tropes that many other cop series fall into; murderers are usually banal and that is exactly how Finch is portrayed.

    Walker and Bhaskar now play the TV cops nonpareil; the characters intuit each other’s thoughts and interact without any flashiness because they’ve worked closely together for some time, and these fine actors are able to effortlessly convey this camaraderie. Please, Mr Lang, let us have more Cassie and Sunny – we’ve really only scratched the surface of their gifts. And please let Cassie keep a bloke for a while.

    Deborah Shrewsbury
    @shrewdkitty


    FOR OUR EPISODE ONE REVIEW CLICK HERE

    FOR OUR EPISODE TWO REVIEW CLICK HERE

    FOR OUR EPISODE THREE REVIEW CLICK HERE

    FOR OUR EPISODE FOUR REVIEW CLICK HERE

    FOR OUR EPISODE FIVE REVIEW CLICK HERE
     
  11. Barbara Fan

    Barbara Fan Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Love this writers reviews of S3, just wish it hadnt ended so soon!

    perfect casting!
     

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