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Words and phrases from your nation

Discussion in 'The Lockdown Lounge' started by Sarah, Mar 20, 2019.

  1. Sarah

    Sarah Super Moderator EXP: 21 Years Staff Member

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    The Irish - Northern Irish in particular - are absolute demons for using the word 'wee' in reference to almost anything.

    It can be endearing, but if used in the wrong context (if a context even exists for it), it can be maddening.

    For example, when using a chip and pin machine 'Put your wee card in there for me'.

    On the phone 'Give me a wee ring'.

    Worse case scenarios, 'He's had a wee car accident'.

    Life threatening, 'She's had a wee turn'.

    Not sure if any of you have ever had the 'wee' pleasure of experiencing this.

    What about you? Does your country use any unique phrases that you can share?

    ‘Wee’A reference to anything and everything regardless of its real size. If you don’t use the phrase at least 4 times per sentence, then you risk being mistaken as an outsider.
     
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  2. Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery Super Moderator EXP: 20 Years Staff Member

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    In the American South (which is much like a whole other nation, thank you very much) we do something similar with "little "ol' " , dropping it into descriptions of all sorts of things, whether they're little, they're old, or neither.

    "I hate that little ol' b---- working the front counter."
    "Hand me that little ol' screwdriver over there."
    "That little ol' sweetie act ain't getting anywhere with me."

    We also have an unhealthy relationship with the abbreviation "hun," (short for "honey") but I think we're slowly getting past it. It's not just for smart-mouthed, sitcom waitresses any more.
    "I'll be right there, hun..."
    "Hun, you need to get out of my way."
    "Problem, hun?"
    "You're gettin' on my nerves, hun."
     
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  3. Rove

    Rove Soap Chat Mega Star EXP: 3 Years

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    G'day. :)
     
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  4. Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery Super Moderator EXP: 20 Years Staff Member

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    Oh, and if someone says "Bless her heart..." (or, even worse, "Bless your heart") it's not nice. It's Southern Code for "She's an idiot" or "Go F--- yourself", depending on the emphasis. The sweeter the inflection, the deeper the cut. Syrupy-sweet smile is optional, but recommended.

    "She tries, bless her heart, but she's no Einstein."
    "Well bless your heart, that was the last doughnut and I hope you choke on it."
     
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  5. Michael Torrance

    Michael Torrance Soap Chat Star

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    I am fascinated that Americans carve answers out of people with their axes.
    "Let me axe you this..."
    "What I am axing is..."
     
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  6. Alexis

    Alexis Soap Chat Hero EXP: 12 Years

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    Isn't it the same with precious.
    "Awee that's just precious sweetie" or "Isn't he just precious" I think I have heard that a few times used in the same way. God, southerners are so shady.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2019
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  7. Alexis

    Alexis Soap Chat Hero EXP: 12 Years

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    Another one from Northern Ireland is "I turned around and said to him" and "Then he turned around and said to me that" and "So I turns around and told him" and then all of a sudden "She bounced in and says to us all any more turning and you'll all be windmills!"
    That kind of thing. Everyone in Northern Ireland is perpetually turning around.
     
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  8. Sarah

    Sarah Super Moderator EXP: 21 Years Staff Member

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    This, I can testify, is true. I also don't know if this is true of many places, but Northern Ireland is WILD (we say that too) for saying 'I was like' followed by 'she was like' and then 'I was like' but then 'he was like'. It fries my head.:eck:
     
  9. Sarah

    Sarah Super Moderator EXP: 21 Years Staff Member

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    YES!!! My friend in Dallas last year taught me this!!! It's so something Sue Ellen would say!!!:love5:
     
  10. Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery Super Moderator EXP: 20 Years Staff Member

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    That's been a pox on the English speaking world since the "Valley Girls" days of the 1980s. It just never went away. The worst part is that these people have 'aged up' into seats of authority and it makes them sound so.damn.stupid when trying to sound authoritative. The "likes" and the "y'knows" dropped into conversation with no context drive me insane.
     
  11. Alexis

    Alexis Soap Chat Hero EXP: 12 Years

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    Although I am sure the Northern Irish version predates those Valley Girls from the '80s. I'm sure ours come from way before that. Maybe from more rural areas.
     
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  12. Daniel Avery

    Daniel Avery Super Moderator EXP: 20 Years Staff Member

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  13. Emelee

    Emelee Soap Chat Winner EXP: 7 Years

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    Really? :eck: I've heard "Bless your heart" said by Brits with nothing but niceness intended. For example, when somone pays you a compliment and you reply "bless your heart".

    - You did great, I wish I had your patience.
    -Oh, bless your heart!
     
  14. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson SoapLand Battles Moderator EXP: 18 Years

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    That's all? I expected more from the Australians:D
     
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  15. Alexis

    Alexis Soap Chat Hero EXP: 12 Years

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    This is why tone is so important. The same phrase or sentence can have different connotations depending on the tone used. Or those snooty Brits could have just been mocking you. You'll never know.... Bless your heart. :giggle:
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
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  16. Rove

    Rove Soap Chat Mega Star EXP: 3 Years

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  17. Sarah

    Sarah Super Moderator EXP: 21 Years Staff Member

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    @Rove what about 'Stroke my flamin' pink bits!' aka Alf Roberts?

    Do Australians say that?

    I know a guy who says 'so it is/was/will' after every other word. And I don't mean in a Jim MacDonald type way. He takes the phrase completely out of context and says it when it really isn't necessary. Not that Jim MacDonald's way of saying anything IS in context.

    Obviously different areas have different dialects - in parts of Ballymena the word 'scundered' becomes 'scunnered' (which isn't even a word), to mean either embarrassed (Belfast) or angry (Ballymena).

    I was also horrified to read that the word 'flange' is used in Ballymena as a type of battered delicacy from the chippy.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2019
  18. Ome

    Ome Admin

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  19. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson SoapLand Battles Moderator EXP: 18 Years

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    This reminds me of the time that I had to pretend to be an Australian who wrote a letter to an Australian friend/SC Big Brother contestant.
     
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  20. Emelee

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    It wasn't said to me, I heard it on telly. 2 co-stars talking with each other. No snootiness or nastiness what so ever between them. It was a genuine compliment followed by a "naaa, bless your heart"

    :love6:
     
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