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Words and phrases from your nation

Discussion in 'The Lockdown Lounge' started by Sarah, Mar 20, 2019.

  1. Sarah

    Sarah Super Moderator EXP: 21 Years Staff Member

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    That's when it is at it's most silent. And deadly. :D
     
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  2. Sarah

    Sarah Super Moderator EXP: 21 Years Staff Member

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    Oh no no no nooooooooooooooooo. Not a Brit.

    To put it in its sinister context, it MUST come from a TEXAN only.
     
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  3. Emelee

    Emelee Soap Chat Winner EXP: 7 Years

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    A brit, yes. English to be exact. Londoner. And 0% other than accepting a compliment.
     
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  4. Emelee

    Emelee Soap Chat Winner EXP: 7 Years

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    I googled it, and Wiktionary says this:

    Phrase
    bless someone's heart

    1. Used to express gratitude. (Compare bless you, God bless you.)
    2. (especially Southern US) Used to soften criticism or express pity. (Compare the British usage of bless (“expression of endearment or belittlement”).)


    Another site said that the original meaning is an expression of endearment.


    So southerns in the US, use it as criticism. For others, it obviously depends on what you have been taught.

    Could it be a generation thing?
     
  5. Alexis

    Alexis Soap Chat Hero EXP: 12 Years

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    Language evolves. Tone and intent can make a sentence or phrase mean two completely different things depending on situation and who is speaking.
    The phrase would have originally been used as an expression of pity used with kindness. Though now it can be used to mock or patronise someone. The English language is full of such confusions.
     
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  6. Willie Oleson

    Willie Oleson SoapLand Battles Moderator EXP: 18 Years

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    I think this is very typical of old-fashioned expressions/phrases, in my own language there are well-known phrases that we normally wouldn't use for the intended situation, so we use it to emphasize (or hint at) the opposite. And of course it makes sense that "pompous" suggests "not genuine" or "silly".
    It's still perfect Dutch and can be used in the original context, but it rarely happens. Only the queen talks like that.
     
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