You're not dreaming: A porn star is suing the president

Discussion in 'Politics & Religion' started by SueEllenRules!, Mar 8, 2018.

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    You're Not Dreaming: A Porn Star Is Suing The President

     
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    White evangelicals voted overwhelmingly for Donald Trump, exit polls show

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    Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump (R) shakes hands with co-headliner Jerry Falwell Jr., leader of Liberty University in Virginia, at a campaign event in Iowa. (Reuters)

    Exit polls show white evangelical voters voted in high numbers for Donald Trump, 80-16 percent, according to exit poll results. That’s the most they have voted for a Republican presidential candidate since 2004, when they overwhelmingly chose President George W. Bush by a margin of 78-21 percent. Their support for Trump will likely be seen as part of the reason the GOP candidate performed unexpectedly well in Tuesday’s election, according to Five Thirty Eight.

    White evangelicals are the religious group that most identifies with the Republican Party, and 76 percent of them say they are or lean Republican, according to a 2014 survey. As a group, white evangelicals make up one-fifth of all registered voters and about one-third of all voters who identify with or lean toward the GOP.

    Evangelicals also play prominently in swing states like Florida, where they are anticipated to make up 20 percent of the state’s votes. There they polled 85-13 percent. Their support for Clinton at 16 percent was less than evangelical support for Obama of 20 percent in 2012.

    Trump’s candidacy has caused a huge divide among evangelical leaders, but evangelical voters coalesced around him as a presidential candidate, many citing his promise to appoint Supreme Court justices who would overturn Roe v. Wade.

    Evangelicals are a subset of Protestant Christians, and there is much debate over who gets to define them and speak for them. Thomas Kidd, a history professor at Baylor University, for instance, has argued that the term “evangelical” has been watered down too much to be a useful term.


    Tuesday’s election, though, will likely create some hand-wringing in the evangelical community about their involvement in politics. Reactions to election results were still trickling out late Tuesday as reactions began to pour in, and some lamented the role of evangelicals in the election.

    Ahead of Tuesday’s election, evangelicals warred among themselves over whether Trump would be a good president. The debate became especially fierce after a video of Trump’s crude comments toward women was published, when evangelical women began to speak out and two prominent evangelical magazines denounced him.

    Trump’s candidacy led to divisions within different evangelical camps. Liberty University Jerry Falwell Jr.’s endorsement of Trump caused division on his own campus. A prominent evangelical theologian Wayne Grudem endorsed Trump, pulled back his endorsement after the video tapes came out, then re-endorsed him.


    Trump’s support from Grudem and Eric Metaxas, an author of a popular biography and radio host, gave conservative evangelicals language to support the GOP candidate. And evangelical leaders from what’s considered the Religious Right also continued to back him, including Pat Robertson, Tony Perkins, Ralph Reed, among others. Texas pastor Robert Jeffress tweeted from Trump’s campaign party on Tuesday night.

    Evangelical support for Trump, a thrice-married, casino-building businessman, was puzzling to some. For instance, leaders like Focus on the Family founder James Dobson who has long opposed gambling, ended up supporting him once he became the GOP Party nominee. Clinton is a churchgoing United Methodist who taught Sunday school and, as a senator, attended weekly prayer breakfasts.

    Trump’s support from evangelicals could be explained at least in part by their deep dislike for Clinton. According to a Post-ABC poll in October, 70 percent of white evangelicals held an unfavorable view of Clinton, compared with 55 percent of the public overall who say the same thing.


    Clinton has symbolized much of what evangelicals have tended to oppose, including abortion rights advocacy and feminism. As first lady, she is tied to conservative Christian loss of culture war battles during Bill Clinton’s presidency.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news...ngly-for-donald-trump/?utm_term=.4ca49a3f71dd
     
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    Stormy Daniels is Suing Donald Trump

     
    Last edited: Mar 8, 2018
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    Can Trump’s lawyers block Stormy Daniels’ ‘60 Minutes’ appearance?

     
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  6. Rove

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    Just sad really but it reflects how the world is moving...straight down the toilet.
     
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    Only Half Of Trump Voters Say Affair With Porn Actress Would Be Immoral
    The other half say it would not be or they are not sure.

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    WASHINGTON ― Only about half of the people who voted for President Donald Trump say it would be immoral if he had an affair with pornographic film actress Stormy Daniels. The other half say it is not immoral, or they are not sure, according to a new HuffPost/YouGov survey published Tuesday.

    Three-quarters of Trump voters also contend that, even if Daniels’ allegations are true, they are not relevant to Trump’s presidency. In fact, they claim to be barely concerned about a president’s private life at all: Seventy percent say an elected official who has committed an “immoral act” in his or her personal life can still behave ethically and fulfill duties in the public and professional sphere.

    Conservatives have long given Trump a pass on his less-than-stellar record on so-called “moral” values. The thrice-married president has been accused of sexual misconduct by more than a dozen women, and boasted of grabbing women “by the pu$$y” and being allowed to do it because he’s famous. He also publicly endorsed Roy Moore for his Alabama Senate campaign after the judge was accused of sexually abusing a 14-year-old girl when he was 32.

    Given what other accusations Trump has weathered thus far, an alleged consensual affair with a porn actress more than a decade ago may seem comparably tame. Daniels, an accomplished equestrian whose given name is Stephanie Clifford, claims she had a tryst with Trump starting in 2006, a few months after Melania Trump gave birth to Trump’s son, Barron. (A Playboy model, Karen McDougal, also claims to have had an affair with Trump around that time.) Trump has denied the allegations.

    Daniels’ story received fresh attention following news reports that Trump’s attorney arranged a $130,000 payment to Daniels shortly before the 2016 election, which barred her from discussing the alleged sexual encounter. Such a payment, if intended to influence the election, may have run afoul of election laws. Daniels is currently fighting a legal battle to share her story publicly.

    Some Trump supporters say the whole story is fake news: Only 20 percent say they find reports of the payment credible, while a mere 11 percent give credence to Daniels’ claim about the affair. Forty percent or more say they haven’t heard enough to weigh in on either question, or that they’re unsure about the allegations.

    Comparatively, more than 80 percent of Hillary Clinton voters say they find each report credible. And though Democrats once sought to downplay former President Bill Clinton’s affair with Monica Lewinsky, 86 percent say that a Trump affair with Daniels would be immoral. Just below a quarter say that elected officials who act immorally in their personal lives can behave ethically in office.

    Christian evangelicals, who helped power Trump to victory in 2016, have in recent years become more accepting of politicians who commit “immoral” acts in their personal lives. There are modest signs that Trump’s hold on some white evangelical women may be slipping, according a New York Times report on Sunday. But compared with the rest of the president’s base, his evangelical supporters appear only slightly more concerned about this latest scandal, according to the HuffPost/YouGov survey.

    About two-thirds of self-described evangelical or “born-again Christians” who voted for Trump say that it would be immoral if Trump had an affair with Daniels, compared to 40 percent of non-evangelical Trump voters. But few evangelical Trump voters say they consider the affair allegations credible, and nearly seven in 10 say that even if true, Daniels’ allegations aren’t relevant to Trump’s presidency.

    More than half of all Trump voters don’t hesitate to say the phrase “moral leader” applies to the president very or extremely well.

    The HuffPost/YouGov poll consisted of 1,000 completed interviews conducted March 9-12 among U.S. adults, using a sample selected from YouGov’s opt-in online panel to match the demographics and other characteristics of the adult U.S. population.

    Only Half Of Trump Voters Say Affair With Porn Actress Would Be Immoral - HuffPost https://apple.news/ATaksZRwxRBeXRalUAwYuQA
     
    Last edited: Mar 14, 2018
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    Stormy Daniels suggests Trump has been . . . bad

     
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    CBS Fixes Date for Stormy Daniels Interview
    The network's flagship news show '60 Minutes' will air the already taped interview with the adult film star on March 25.

    CBS' 60 Minutes is set to air a recently taped interview with Stormy Daniels, the adult film star who reportedly had an affair with President Donald Trump, on March 25, The Hollywood Reporter has confirmed.

    Earlier on Thursday, The Washington Post reported that CBS News was going ahead with the scheduled date as sources at the network had told the paper that no one from the Trump Organization nor the White House has attempted to stop the interview from airing, despite a tweet from Daniels' lawyer Michael Avenatti last weekend that Trump's lawyers were planning an injunction.

    Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, alleges that she had an affair with Trump in 2006 and that she was paid $130,000 as part of a hush agreement agreed weeks before the 2016 presidential election. Trump's personal Michael Cohen has admitted to paying the money but has denied the affair, and last month he reportedly attempted to get a temporary restraining order against Daniels to stop her from speaking about the matter.

    Last week, Daniels' lawyers sought to void the nondisclosure agreement, arguing that Trump had failed to sign the documents, enabling her to speak freely about the affair.

    CBS Fixes Date for Stormy Daniels Interview - The Hollywood Reporter https://apple.news/A41UCiCqqRWC9cSzO965hhA
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2018
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    Stormy Daniels CrowdJustice Campaign Nets Nearly $250,000 in Less Than a Week
    More than 8,000 people have donated to help pay the adult film star's legal bills, making the campaign one of the crowdfunding site's "most successful" in its history.

    In less than a week, a crowdfunding campaign to help adult film star Stormy Daniels pay legal fees for a looming battle royale with President Donald Trump's lawyer has raised close to a quarter of a million dollars. The campaign is one of the platform's most successful fundraisers ever.

    The CrowdJustice campaign raked in close to $250,000 since its creation on March 14, with donations pouring in every hour. So far, more than 8,000 people have contributed to the fund.

    "It has been one of the most successful campaigns on the platform, and certainly has involved one of the most high profile people to use the platform," a CrowdJustice spokesperson told Newsweek.

    Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, said she set up the campaign so that can "speak honestly and openly" against the "intimidation tactics" used by Trump's lawyer, Michael Cohen, and the president himself, she wrote in the campaign description.

    Daniels has been trying to invalidate a nondisclosure agreement she signed with Cohen in October 2016 for $130,000, which forbids her from speaking publically about an alleged affair she had with Trump between 2006 and 2007. Daniels' lawyers, who filed the suit in a Los Angeles Superior Court, argue that the agreement is unenforceable because Trump never signed it.

    "I need funds to pay for: attorneys' fees; out-of-pocket costs associated with the lawsuit, arbitration, and my right to speak openly; security expenses; and damages that may be awarded against me if I speak out and ultimately lose to Mr. Trump and Mr. Cohen," Daniels wrote.

    In an update on March 15, the 39-year-old added that none of the money would be used for personal expenses.

    "First, I want to be clear as to what this money is NOT being raised for," she wrote. "This money is not going to me personally. Ever. It is only being used to cover the legal expenses and potential damages I describe on the home page."

    Most of the contributions range from $10 to $25, although there are a few $200 donations and a couple $500 donations. The funds go directly to a lawyer who has been verified by CrowdJustice, according to the platform.

    In the comment section, where donors can leave a message for the beneficiary of a campaign, people have urged Daniels to expose the president.

    "Proud to do my part as an American," wrote one contributor. "I literally type this with tears in my eyes, please stick it to that bastard, and open the door for the other six ladies to be able to speak as well."

    Daniels' lawyer Michael Avenatti said he has been approached by six other women who claim to have had affairs with Trump.

    Cohen, meanwhile, has said that he entered into the agreement on his own behalf and that Trump was not involved in the proceedings, despite the longtime lawyer having used a Trump Organization email address to negotiate the funds.

    "The funds were taken from my home equity line and transferred internally to my LLC account in the same bank," Cohen said in a statement, adding that it was a "private transaction."

    Along with Beverly Hills attorney Charles Harder, who is representing Trump in the dispute, Cohen is attempting to move the case to a federal court after having already been granted an injunction that further prevents Daniels from speaking out. Her lawyer labeled the request for venue change a "bullying tactic."

    Stormy Daniels CrowdJustice Campaign Nets Nearly $250,000 in Less Than a Week - Newsweek https://apple.news/A4l4WF_SYSLeooJMFQbrHww
     
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    Wall Street Journal publishes polygraph results backing Stormy Daniels

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    A polygraph exam taken by adult-film star Stormy Daniels in 2011 supported her account of an affair she said she had with Donald Trump five years earlier, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday.

    The newspaper obtained reports of the exam, which Daniels took on May 19, 2011. The polygraph showed she truthfully said she had unprotected sex with Trump around July 2006.

    She also said Trump told her she would get on his television show, "The Apprentice," but the accuracy of that answer was inconclusive.

    The White House and Trump's personal lawyer, Michael Cohen, have denied that the president ever had an affair with Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford.

    While the exam supports Daniels's version of events, polygraph results are generally not admissible in court on the grounds that they are not "generally accepted" as scientifically reliable evidence.

    Daniels's alleged affair with Trump has remained in the spotlight since The Wall Street Journal reported in January that Cohen paid her $130,000 as part of a nondisclosure agreement just weeks before the 2016 presidential election.

    The Journal reported Tuesday that before the story was published, Cohen reached out to Daniels and her attorney to request they craft a denial that she had an affair with Trump.

    Cohen has acknowledged the payment, but denied it violated campaign finance laws or had to do with the election.

    Daniels filed a lawsuit earlier this month claiming the agreement is void because Trump never signed it.

    The president accused the adult-film star in court papers filed last week of repeatedly violating the nondisclosure agreement. He is seeking up to $20 million in damages.

    Daniels recently spoke with Anderson Cooper in an interview that is scheduled to air on "60 Minutes" on Sunday.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/poli...ing-stormy-daniels/ar-BBKtDT1?ocid=spartanntp
     
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    Former Playboy Model Karen McDougal Sues to Break Silence on Trump

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    Karen McDougal in 2010. Ms. McDougal, a former Playboy model, claims she had an affair with Donald J. Trump.

    A former Playboy model who claimed she had an affair with Donald J. Trump sued on Tuesday to be released from a 2016 legal agreement requiring her silence, becoming the second woman this month to challenge Trump allies’ efforts during the presidential campaign to bury stories about extramarital relationships.

    (Read the complaint.)

    The model, Karen McDougal, is suing the company that owns The National Enquirer, American Media Inc., which paid her $150,000 and whose chief executive is a friend of President Trump’s. The other woman, the adult entertainment star Stephanie Clifford, better known as Stormy Daniels, was paid $130,000 to stay quiet by the president’s personal lawyer, Michael D. Cohen. She filed suit earlier this month.

    Both women, who argue that their contracts are invalid, are trying to get around clauses requiring them to resolve disputes in secretive arbitration proceedings rather than in open court. Mr. Trump has denied the affairs.

    Ms. McDougal, in a lawsuit filed in Los Angeles Superior Court, claims that Mr. Cohen was secretly involved in her talks with A.M.I., and that the media company and her lawyer at the time misled her about the deal. She also asserts that after she spoke with The New Yorker last month after it obtained notes she kept on Mr. Trump, A.M.I. warned that “any further disclosures would breach Karen’s contract” and “cause considerable monetary damages.”

    In an email to The New York Times, her new lawyer, Peter K. Stris, accused A.M.I. of “a multifaceted effort to silence Karen McDougal.”

    “The lawsuit filed today aims to restore her right to her own voice,” he said, adding, “We intend to invalidate the so-called contract that American Media Inc. imposed on Karen so she can move forward with the private life she deserves.”

    Ms. McDougal filed her suit just days before Ms. Clifford was to appear on “60 Minutes” to discuss her relationship with Mr. Trump and the efforts Mr. Cohen undertook on his client’s behalf to pay for her silence.

    Mr. Trump joined a legal effort last week seeking some $20 million in penalties tied to Ms. Clifford’s agreement.

    The court dispute has drawn public attention to an issue that was previously sidelined. And both women’s suits could provide more fodder for federal complaints from the watchdog group Common Cause that the payoffs were, effectively, illegal campaign contributions.

    Ms. Clifford and Ms. McDougal tell strikingly similar stories about their experiences with Mr. Trump, which included alleged trysts at the same Lake Tahoe golf tournament in 2006, dates at the same Beverly Hills hotel and promises of apartments as gifts. Their stories first surfaced in the The Wall Street Journal four days before the election, but got little traction in the swirl of news that followed Mr. Trump’s victory. The women even shared the same Los Angeles lawyer, Keith Davidson, who has long worked for clients who sell their stories to the tabloids.

    Ms. McDougal negotiated with the country’s leading tabloid news provider, A.M.I., which is known to buy and bury stories that might damage friends and allies of its chief executive, David J. Pecker — a practice known as “catch and kill.”

    Ms. McDougal’s legal complaint alleges that she did not know about the practice, or about Mr. Pecker’s friendship with Mr. Trump, when she began talking to company representatives in spring 2016, shortly after Mr. Trump locked up the Republican nomination.

    A.M.I. has previously acknowledged that Mr. Trump had been friends with Mr. Pecker, but said that he had never tried to influence coverage at the company’s publications.

    Ms. McDougal has said that she was ambivalent about selling her story on the tabloid news market, but felt that her hand was forced after a hint of the alleged affair appeared in May 2016 on social media. Convinced something more would come out, she was determined to tell her story on her terms, her suit says.

    A mutual friend connected her to Mr. Davidson, who, she said, told her the story could be worth millions. He arranged an interview with Dylan Howard, A.M.I.’s chief content officer, in Los Angeles. Mr. Davidson told her before the interview that A.M.I. would put $500,000 in an escrow account for her, and that “a seven-figure publishing contract awaited her,” the complaint reads.

    Mr. Howard spent several hours pressing Ms. McDougal on the details of her story. But several days later, the media company declined to buy it, the complaint reads, and “Mr. Davidson revealed that, in fact, there was no money in escrow.”

    A spokesman for Mr. Davidson said on Tuesday that the lawyer “fulfilled his obligations and zealously advocated for Ms. McDougal to accomplish her stated goals at that time,” but that commenting further would “violate attorney-client privilege.”

    A.M.I. told The Times last month that it decided not to print Ms. McDougal’s story because it could not verify important details, though it acknowledged discussing her allegations with Mr. Cohen, the president’s lawyer, saying it did so as part of its reporting process.

    The tabloid company showed renewed interest in the story in summer 2016, when Ms. McDougal began talks with ABC News. This time, A.M.I. offered a different deal.

    Mr. Davidson informed her that A.M.I. would buy her story but not publish it because of Mr. Pecker’s relationship with Mr. Trump, the suit says. The payment would be $150,000, with Mr. Davidson and others involved on her behalf taking 45 percent. More alluring to Ms. McDougal, who is now a fitness specialist, was that the media company would feature her on its covers and in regular health and fitness columns, the complaint says.

    As A.M.I. and Mr. Davidson pushed her to sign the deal on Aug. 5, Ms. McDougal expressed misgivings. But, her suit says, Mr. Davidson and Mr. Howard argued in an urgent Skype call that the deal to promote her would “kick start and revitalize” her career, given that she was “old now.” She was 45.

    In all, they said, the contract would obligate A.M.I. to run more than 100 columns or articles and at least two covers featuring her. When she asked Mr. Davidson what she should do if her story leaked, he responded in an email, “IF YOU DENY YOU ARE SAFE,” and urged her to sign as soon as possible, according to the court documents.

    The Times reported last month that Mr. Davidson sent Mr. Cohen an email on Aug. 5, 2016, asking him to call. Mr. Davidson then told Mr. Cohen over the phone that the deal had been completed, according to a person familiar with the conversation.

    The timeline provided in the lawsuit shows that Mr. Davidson’s email came as he and A.M.I. were still hashing out the terms of the deal, which Ms. McDougal did not sign until the following day, Aug. 6. Mr. Cohen told The Times last month that he did not recall the communications.

    After signing the contract, Ms. McDougal grew frustrated when she did not hear about columns or cover shoots for several weeks. She later figured out why. Though the agreement explicitly mentioned “a monthly column” on aging and fitness for OK! and Star, and “four posts each month” on Radar Online, it only gave A.M.I. “the right” to print them. It was not an obligation.

    “She was tricked into signing it while being misled as to its contents (including by her own lawyer, on whose advice she was entitled to rely),” the lawsuit reads. So far, A.M.I. has run one cover and roughly two dozen columns or posts featuring her. The company later amended her contract to let her respond to “legitimate press inquiries” about Mr. Trump.

    Mr. Stris contends that his client was misled and that the contract was executed under fraudulent circumstances, giving her the right to sue in court rather than proceed in arbitration.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/poli...k-silence-on-trump/ar-BBKtIda?ocid=spartanntp
     
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    Evangelicals flock to Trump as he weathers Stormy Daniels scandal
    Amid the Stormy Daniels headlines, Trump’s support from evangelicals has risen in the past few months.

    As his presidency enters year two, Donald Trump's political support ratings have slowly declined as increasing numbers of his supporters seem to be reevaluating their opinions of him. Trump began his administration with a 50 percent approval rating in aggregated polls, which has dipped to 39 percent as of this writing.

    Almost anyway you slice it, Trump's numbers are lower now than they were before, even among Republicans. There is one group that has maintained (and even increased) its support for the president, however: white evangelical Protestants.

    In a January survey from the Pew Research Center, 72 percent of self-identified white evangelicals said they approved of the way that Trump is doing his job, with 21 percent disapproving. In a March poll, 78 percent said they approved with just 18 percent saying they disapproved. White evangelicals were the only group in the two studies who became more supportive of Trump.

    It's notable that probably the biggest news that broke during the two months was the revelation that the president's personal attorney, Michael Cohen, had paid $130,000 to porn actress and director Stormy Daniels shortly before the election.

    Outside critics of the evangelical movement, and even some inside it, have observed that the relationship between evangelicals and Trump — a man who clearly has no familiarity with the Bible and has boasted about groping women — is simply about politics. He works on their agenda items and hires their people and they, in turn, support him loyally.

    According to David Brody, the White House correspondent for Pat Robertson's Christian Broadcasting Network, that's simply not the case.

    "Critics say that the Trump-evangelical relationship is transactional, that they support him to see their agenda carried out. In fact, evangelicals take the long view on Mr. Trump; they afford him grace when he doesn’t deserve it," Brody wrote in a February New York Times op-ed. "Few dispute that Mr. Trump may need a little more grace than others. But evangelicals truly do believe that all people are flawed, and yet Christ offers them grace. Shouldn’t they do the same for the president?"

    That sentiment is one that's been echoed by a number of fundamentalist Protestants, some of whom have begun comparing Trump to the Biblical stories about King Cyrus, a pagan ruler who was said to have been an instrument of God's, despite the fact that he was not a Hebrew.

    Other evangelicals, however, are much more willing to admit that they are, indeed, engaged in a political relationship. One such person is Tony Perkins, the head of the Family Research Council who originally supported Texas Sen. Ted Cruz for the 2016 GOP nomination, only to move toward Trump once his candidacy became inevitable.

    "Folks, you have no reason to be ashamed of supporting this president. He has kept his promises, and as long as he continues to keep those promises and he continues to conduct himself in a way that is in keeping with the office—you know, if he were to engage in behavior like Bill Clinton, we’re out of here. That support would evaporate quickly,” Perkins told the audience of his daily radio show last Monday, in remarks transcribed by Right Wing Watch.

    Still other evangelical leaders seem to view their support for Trump as a matter of identity. Conservative media has become so suffused with criticisms of "liberal elites" who allegedly persecute Christians that many seem to believe Trump is their battering ram against the left. In a March 2017 poll done by the Public Religion Research Institute, more evangelicals said they were discriminated against by society than Muslims were.

    Sure of their own righteousness, some more conspiracy-oriented evangelicals see dark spiritual forces inspiring liberals and socialists.

    Rick Wiles, the host of a web show called "TruNews" told viewers last week that "America smells like putrid vomit in the nostrils of the Lord" because of its willingness to tolerate LGBT rights, in contrast to Russia, which does not.

    "You had better be careful about saying, ‘Oh, we’re going to have a war, we’re going to beat Russia,’" he warned hypothetical left-wing viewers of his show. "You better be very careful, because the Lord may be on Russia’s side in this war."

    “They’re acting more Christian than us,” he said. “This nation has embraced homosexuality, lewdness, pornography, every vile thing, paganism, the gods of the East, we’ve embraced it in this country and the church just accommodates it.”

    According to Star Parker, a rare black conservative evangelical, Democrats have shown themselves to be the minions of Satan.

    “I don’t think that they [Americans in general] understand how evil that the Democrat Party has become and how entrenched it is in the Democrat philosophy and their platform—abortion, killing what God calls His reward,” she said during a March 6 interview with the Family Research Council.

    “It is the party of anti-Christ,” she added. “They do not believe anything of scripture. When the Bible says don’t do something, they want to do it. When the Bible says do do something, they don’t want to. So it is good for us to be here, to testify, to bring that out of them, those congressional leaders, so that the people in the district now recognize who their congressman really is and they have a decision to make.”

    https://www.salon.com/2018/03/19/evangelicals-flock-to-trump-as-he-weathers-stormy-daniels-scandal/
     
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    Trump’s lawyer paid off Stormy Daniels because he ‘cares’

     
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    Trump’s state of affairs. . . actual affairs

     
  16. SueEllenRules!

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    Trumps will be apart when Daniels interview airs
    Melania Trump staying in Palm Beach for spring break

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    First Lady Melania Trump will remain in Florida while President Trump travels back to Washington, D.C., on Sunday, the White House said.

    "The first lady will be staying in Florida as is their tradition for spring break," deputy press secretary Lindsay Walters said in a statement.

    Trump and the first lady spent the weekend in Florida at Trump's Mar-A-Lago club. Trump will return to the White House on Sunday evening.

    The Trumps will be apart Sunday evening when "60 Minutes" airs its interview with adult film star Stormy Daniels, who claims she had an affair with Donald Trump shortly after Melania gave birth to their son, Barron.

    Trump denies the affair. The first lady has not commented on the allegations.

    Daniels' account of her affair with Trump has remained in the spotlight since The Wall Street Journal reported in January that Trump's attorney, Michael Cohen, paid Daniels $130,000 in October 2016 as part of a non-disclosure agreement.

    Cohen acknowledged making the payment, but said it had nothing to do with Trump's presidential campaign and did not violate campaign finance laws.

    Daniels has sued, claiming the nondisclosure agreement is invalid because Trump never signed it. In response, Trump's team sued Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, claiming she violated the agreement.

    CNN aired an interview late last week with former Playboy model Karen McDougal, who also alleges she had an affair with Trump while he was married to Melania.

    McDougal apologized when asked what she would say to the first lady if she had the chance to speak to her now.

    "What can you say except 'I'm sorry?'" McDougal said. "I'm sorry. I wouldn't want it done to me."

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/poli...h-for-spring-break/ar-BBKGcUV?ocid=spartandhp
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2018
  17. SueEllenRules!

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    Seven things to watch for in the Stormy Daniels interview

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    Stormy Daniels' interview with CBS's "60 Minutes" is set to air Sunday night, raising questions about what the adult film actress could reveal about her alleged affair with President Trump.

    The interview has so far been shrouded in mystery. Even Daniels' lawyer, Michael Avenatti, acknowledged on Sunday that he is not entirely sure what will be included in the segment. He has also teased the possibility that Daniels will unveil hard evidence to back up her claims.

    Daniels, whose real name is Stephanie Clifford, alleges that she carried on an affair with Trump in 2006, and that she was paid to remain silent on the matter as the real estate mogul sought the presidency in 2016.

    Hanging over the interview are questions about whether she will throw out a nondisclosure agreement (NDA) with Trump and speak openly about the alleged affair, and what the segment could mean for her ongoing lawsuit.

    Here are seven things to watch for in Daniels' interview:

    1. Will she give details about the nondisclosure agreement?

    Daniels has never spoken publicly about the nondisclosure agreement that purportedly bars her from admitting to her alleged affair with Trump.

    But a lawsuit filed by Daniels earlier this month confirmed the existence of such a document, arguing that it is invalid because it was never co-signed by Trump himself.

    Whether Daniels will discuss the details of the agreement in the "60 Minutes" interview remains to be seen. Her lawsuit seeking to void the contract is still pending, and NDAs often prohibit signatories from speaking about the agreements.

    Daniels has hinted that that is true of her NDA. During an interview with late night host Jimmy Kimmel in January, Kimmel pointed out that Daniels would likely be barred from discussing the agreement if it, in fact, existed.

    "You're so smart, Jimmy," was her cagey response.

    2. Will she talk openly about the alleged affair?

    Daniels has implied that she was paid $130,000 by Trump's personal attorney Michael Cohen weeks before the 2016 presidential election to keep quiet about the alleged affair.

    Speaking openly about her alleged affair with Trump would certainly violate the terms of the disputed NDA, and could subject Daniels to legal penalties.

    In court papers filed earlier this month, Trump's lawyers said that Daniels could face up to $20 million in damages for allegedly violating terms of the agreement.

    One question that remains is whether Daniels could toss out the NDA completely in her "60 Minutes" interview, and provide details about her alleged relationship with the president. The last time she spoke about it was 2011, when she gave an interview to InTouch magazine that wasn't published until this year.

    3. Will she mention possible video or photographic evidence?

    Avenatti has repeatedly hinted that video or photographic evidence of Daniels' alleged affair with Trump exists.

    The March 6 lawsuit filed by Daniels to void the nondisclosure agreement with Trump refers to "certain still images and/or text messages which were authored by or relate to" the president. While the NDA reportedly required her to turn over such material and get rid of her own copies, Avenatti has suggested that Daniels may have retained it.

    Avenatti hinted this week that he may be in possession of such material, tweeting a cryptic photo of a compact disc inside of what appeared to be a safe.

    "If “a picture is worth a thousand words,” how many words is this worth?????#60minutes #pleasedenyit #basta" he wrote on Twitter.

    [​IMG]
    https://twitter.com/MichaelAvenatti/status/977015170231885825

    4. Will she address whether she was physically threatened?

    Avenatti prompted questions earlier this month when he said that Daniels had been threatened with physical harm in connection with the alleged affair with Trump.

    Asked on MSNBC's "Morning Joe" whether Daniels had been physically threatened, Avenatti bluntly replied, "yes."

    Exactly who may have threatened Daniels or what the nature of those threats may have been is unclear, and Avenatti has declined to discuss the matter in greater detail.

    Daniels herself has not addressed any potential physical threats that she may have gotten, leaving open whether she will discuss the topic in the "60 Minutes" interview.

    5. Will she discuss whether Trump knew about the $130k payment?

    Cohen himself has acknowledged making the payment to Daniels, but has insisted that the money came from his personal funds and that Trump was never made aware of the transaction.

    White House press secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders has said she does not believe Trump knew about the payment.

    But Avenatti has argued otherwise, saying the fact that Cohen used a Trump Organization email address backs up his claim that the real estate mogul was aware of the transaction.

    In an interview on "Morning Joe" last week, Avenatti also suggested that he had more evidence that Trump knew about the payment. Asked by Willie Geist if his "belief that the president directed this payment is based on more than a hunch," Avenatti simply replied, "yes," but declined to provide any evidence.

    6. Why does she want to talk about the affair now?

    Daniels' lawsuit claims that she expressed interest in discussing the alleged affair publicly in 2016 after The Washington Post published a now-infamous 2005 recording in which Trump could be heard boasting about groping and kissing women without their permission.

    It was at this point that Cohen and Trump "aggressively sought to silence Ms. Clifford," according to the lawsuit, which claims that the $130,000 payment and nondisclosure agreement soon followed.

    But for more than a year after that, Daniels was silent about the alleged affair, and it was only in recent months that the accusations resurfaced.

    One thing to watch for is whether Daniels addresses her motives in the "60 Minutes" interview, or answers questions about what she hopes will happen next.

    7. What happens next?

    There may be hints of what Daniels' next steps are in the interview. A planned court hearing for Daniels' lawsuit is still months away. However, whatever Daniels reveals in the interview may force the hand of Trump's own legal team.

    After news broke that CBS intended to air the "60 Minutes" segment with Daniels, speculation swirled that Trump's lawyers would take legal action seeking to block the broadcast.

    Such legal action would have been unlikely to proceed, because courts rarely allow such prior restraint of speech, particularly regarding the news media.

    But Trump's legal team has already signaled they're willing to fight Daniels on her claims. They reportedly asked for a temporary restraining order against her last month and have asked to transfer the lawsuit from California state court to a federal court in Los Angeles.

    But how Trump and his lawyers respond to the interview after it airs will be closely watched.

    https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/poli...-daniels-interview/ar-BBKGnqh?ocid=spartandhp
     
  18. SueEllenRules!

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    Stormy Daniels’ ‘60 Minutes’ ratings beat Trump’s

     
  19. SueEllenRules!

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    60 More Minutes: Stephen Colbert interviews Anderson Cooper’s interview of Stormy Daniels

     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2018
  20. SueEllenRules!

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    Stormy Daniels' lawyer seeks to depose President Trump, Michael Cohen
    Stormy Daniels' attorney asked a federal judge this morning for permission to depose President Donald J. Trump about his knowledge of an agreement to pay the porn star $130,000 a week and a half before the 2016 election.

    In a motion filed in federal court in Los Angeles, Daniels' attorney, Michael J. Avenatti, requested a deposition "of no greater than two hours" of the President. Avenatti also asked for a court order to depose the President's personal attorney, Michael D. Cohen, who has said he made the $130,000 payment to Stormy Daniels with his own funds and without Mr. Trump's knowledge.

    If successful, Avenatti's motion would require the President to explain, under oath, what he knew about the secrecy agreement and when. The testimony could potentially play a role in determining whether campaign finance laws were broken by the President, Mr. Cohen, or the Trump campaign.

    Stormy Daniels "intends to prove that the Hush Agreement did not have a lawful object or purpose," Avenatti argues in the motion. "Rather, the Agreement and the $130,000 payment made pursuant to the Agreement, was for the 'purpose of influencing' the 2016 presidential election by silencing Plaintiff from speaking openly and publicly about Mr. Trump just weeks before the 2016 election."

    Avenatti is also asking U.S. district court judge S. James Otero to allow Stormy Daniels' legal team to issue "no more than ten targeted requests for production of documents directed to Mr. Trump and Mr. Cohen on various topics relating to the Agreement."

    David Schwartz, an attorney who serves as a spokesperson for Michael Cohen, said shortly before the motion was filed: "I'm sure he [Avenatti] does want to depose the president. This case is so illogical, it's not going to happen. You can't make that happen by bringing a frivolous action."

    In a statement provided to CBS News Wednesday morning, Schwartz called the motion "a reckless use of the legal system in order to continue to inflate Michael Avenatti's deflated ego and keep himself relevant. His statements are ludicrous when he asks where Michael Cohen and Donald Trump are? He knows they are following the rules of the court. They are handling the case in a court of competent jurisdiction and as a lawyer, he needs to do the same. This is politically motivated and people see through this charade."

    Mr. Trump and Mr. Cohen's attorneys want Judge Otero to send the Stormy Daniels dispute to private and confidential arbitration, as the agreement requires. But Avenatti says the agreement is not valid because Mr. Trump never signed it, because Mr. Cohen violated it by making public statements, and because the terms of the agreement are "unconscionable."

    If there is no agreement, Avenatti argues, there is nothing to arbitrate. He is asking for an expedited trial, before a jury, on the question of whether or not the agreement is valid.

    Mr. Schwartz, Cohen's spokesman, says Mr. Trump's signature was not required on the agreement. He argues it's enough that Mr. Cohen signed it on behalf of the Delaware-based limited liability corporation, Essential Consultants, which paid Stormy Daniels the money.

    According to the motion filed this morning, Ms. Daniels' team has scheduled a court hearing on April 30th at 10 a.m. Mr. Avenatti is requesting that depositions be conducted within 21 days of the judge's ruling and that a jury trial start within 90 days.

    Stormy Daniels' real name is Stephanie Clifford. She's 39 years old and has been writing, directing, and acting in adult films for nearly 20 years. She says she had sex with Donald Trump in July 2006 and continued to stay in touch with him for about a year. Through his spokesman, the President has denied having a sexual relationship with Ms. Clifford.

    Judge Otero was nominated to the federal bench in 2003 by President George W. Bush.

    The court papers Avenatti filed today reference the case of Bill Clinton v Paula Jones, which went all the way to the Supreme Court. In that case, the majority concluded that the "Constitution does not offer a sitting President significant protections from potentially distracting civil litigation."

    Stormy Daniels' lawyer seeks to depose President Trump, his lawyer - CBS News https://apple.news/Ax96hMnJWTQSNXybe8-VpEg
     

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